1 Clever Trick For Calming Down Over Excited Dogs

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Does your dog get WAY too excited and out of control when he sees something he wants in his environment? ¬†Watch this video to discover a clever trick for how to finally start teaching your dog to calm down on command…

Then click here to learn even more:
http://thedogtrainingsecret.com/brain-games

Does Your Dog Need Help Staying Calm?

Check out our Impulse Control program, where we walk you through teaching your dog how to relax around those things that get him too excited.

Click here to learn this ‘Impulse Control’ & Relaxating training process

There are 52 Comments

  1. Jonna Aldrich says:

    I am definitely buying

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  2. Ill try this out.ive got three that all want to go

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  3. Very interesting Video. Thank you for sending it for free. I hope to buy your advertized book soon. You seem to be down to earth and that makes me trust you and feel like I might learn something from you.

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  4. FRANCIS says:

    My dog chews on everything he think its a toy
    I would like to train him to sit on one command

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  5. Anne Borden, says:

    My normally well-trained and controlable standard poodle goes nuts in the car-attacking me as I get into the seat beside him and after I get him calmed down he whines and yips throughout the trip.
    He is a rescue and was 7-8 yrs old when I got him, about 5 years ago. Any suggestions?

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  6. Mary says:

    Need help with 1 yr old golden doodle that jumps & pees on people?

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  7. Bette Meng says:

    Perfect! This is just what I needed. Can’t wait to get home and try this. I believe this will be so easy. I have two dogs that get so excited when they need to go out that they won’t hardly let me get to the door. One dog is really good with commands and the other is just a little over a year old and rotten. I’ll let you know my results!!!!

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  8. Eleanor Agbayani says:

    I’m ready to give my German Shepard away.hes 1 years old and very strong.ive just had knee surgery and can’t handle him he keeps jumping on me and when I need to take him out for a walk he won’t let me put his lease on.plus he’s destroying my back yard. Need help

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  9. Katherine says:

    Great control without yelling jerking dog around etc!!! You have given so many training tips that ACTUALLY WORK!!! And they are all POSITIVE reinforcements that change a dogs thought pattern to do what WE as humans consider acceptable behaviors to live in our world…thank you very much for sharing and the training that so many PEOPLE need to help their dogs live in harmony with us!!! KUDOS!!

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  10. Sheri Galvez says:

    Thank you for this great technique. How do I get our pack from tearing the sofa apart, literally destroying it ? Sheri

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  11. DJ says:

    Great stuff. I have bought some of his videos before. When my aussie/collie/miniture sheltie started agility training at our local dog club, she was able to skip the first obedience class because she passed her first test with flying colors without taking home manners because of “thedogtrainingsecret”. She still had to take her public manners class but had a lot of that already learned too. She passed her CGC (canine good citizen) and is now certified by the national AKC. She can now branch out into therapy dog work, nose work competition, agility or rally competition, or whatever is best for us to train for and to do. Thanks.

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  12. tony says:

    the black dog didnt make hardly any eye contact but interesting to watch gave me insight

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  13. Elizabeth Fuller says:

    I was interested by the method of tempting your dogs by putting leads on them and then opening the door and , even when they waited patiently refusing to let them out . I am calm and patient but it made me agitated , frustrated and finally depressed . The nudging with the foot was also interesting . Please do not blame your dogs if they turn on you or merely turn away – you are really pushing them to the limit without any good reason . What a good thing they are good natured and , obviously understandably confused, but loyal and wanting to obey .

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  14. Suzy says:

    How to prevent rescued labrador dog from “jumping on vehicle door & scratching the paint” to greet any vehicle pulling into the driveway including my own.. With the high cost of vehicles, dog scratches on the outside door can become costly damage. It has gotten so bad that I must warn friends to call prior to pulling into driveway. With my being inside the vehicle, it has been difficult to even attempt any control to prevent such damage.

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  15. Kathleen Gee says:

    I think you need to take a closer look:
    1. The woman outside the picture was taking the leashes OFF, as proven by
    them running out without any other physical contact by his person.

    2. He didn’t kick the dog at all. He nudged him, just like you might gently
    nudge your dog if he is in the way.

    3. The black dog (I assume you mean the smaller one in the background)
    didn’t need to make eye contact. He was already calm.

    4. The dog was not confused. He was learning how to go out the door in an
    acceptable manner and that took some time to figure out. He had to have
    time to mentally process the information he was receiving fromChet.

    5. Chet was not “refusing” to let Sam out. He was giving him time to settle
    down on his own, which he did.

    My dog goes nuts at the door, too. This is a wonderful technique. Can’t wait to try it!!

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  16. Kathleen Gee says:

    Oops! My previous comment was for Elizabeth. It didn’t go in the right place.

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  17. Jackie Wilde says:

    My dog barks hysterically when it’s time to go out. I don’t open the door/gate until he is looking at me and “Quiet.” The minute I let him out, he starts barking hysterically (I swear, he can scream). I do the same thing at the 2 gates we need to get out of. Quiet and then scream – any suggestions? He is 27 mo. old Bernese Mtn. dog.

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    Minette Reply:

    I would utilize a leash or long line and when you let him out and he runs out and screams, quietly reel him in tell him quiet and bring him inside until he understands quiet in both places.

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  18. its ok, Kathleen, i think Elizabeth will still see it. well said btw! It was frustrating and hard to watch Elizabeth, i kept wanting to let him out cuz i thought he had held eye contact long enough , but then when he ‘did it’ I understood what he did, what Chet was waiting for Sam to realize and do. it’s fantastic! my question is : how do i apply this to five dogs running to the door?? LOL

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  19. Bob says:

    Both my dogs 3 and 5, healers, bark uncontrollably, at UPS or anyone at the door. I go to the gsrage, while they hammer the front door. Obviously we are a big step before this video

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  20. Dianne Pritchett says:

    My dog is 6 months old and needs to learn manners, SERIOUSLY!! I have a cat that is afraid of anything that moves. I have three other cats who reside in our bedroom suite with outdoor access. In order to keep the ‘fraidy cat’ calm, we keep the dog in a crate at night in our bedroom. Then when she whines to go out, we take her out. But this morning ‘fraidy cat’ went to the doggie door and when I brought out the dog, the dog chased the cat. She would not come back to me. Now I don’t know where ‘fraidy cat’ is. HELP!! I don’t punish the dog but how do I channel her excitement to obey me, not the instinct to follow the cat?

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  21. Patty says:

    Elizabeth, what Chet did with the dogs helps to teach them self control. They were waiting but would anticipate going out the door before he released them to do so. Having a leash on or an open door being an indicator to the dog that it is ok to go out is potentially dangerous for the dog. Ssuppose Chet put the leash on the dog and turned back to get something he had forgotten and a child opened the door. My dog does not go through any door including the car door until she is given my ok. This is really no different then putting your child’s coat and hat and making them wait until you put your coat and hat on and take their hand to walk them out the door. He also was not kicking the dogs just gently indicating to them that they were not permitted to go out yet. The dogs are more likely to respect Chet for what he is doing than turn on him.

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  22. Ali says:

    My do wines, barks and jumps when people come in. If she does. It know them she continues barking

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  23. Dyan says:

    So now i see a dog finally escaping and on its own.

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  24. Cherryl says:

    Walk time at our house is insane. I have three dogs and as soon as the shoes go on they are jumping at the door and carting in. I started this training and it has gotten better. My question is do I need to train it with each individual dog before putting them all together? Perhaps I would get better results or keep trying with all three. They seem to all get into a frenzy while sitting and waiting at the door.

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  25. Bette Meng says:

    Well said. I certainly agree with these comments.

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  26. Bette Meng says:

    Okay, I have tried this technique and it is great. Didn’t exactly get it down the first time, but with a little more practice, both dogs will be much calmer. This is actually an easy way to get a dogs attention and be in control. Thanks again Chet for a wonderful technique to teach manners to our dogs.

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  27. Paulette Melick says:

    Chet, I have Calm Dog and House Manners and I have watched them many times, but this video added another layer of understanding for me. Thank you for sharing it.

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  28. I wish I could comment in the present tense, but at the time I am dogless. My Samoyed…RIP… however, used to have this same problem. I would have liked to have had this video a few months ago. I am however, saving all the videos and emails Chet is sending out, so that when I get my new Sammie puppy, I will have the educational materials to train him right, from the beginning. Thank you Chet!

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  29. Dolores Alimi says:

    I have been fostering dogs for a 100% no kill dog rescue group in Randolph, NJ since the end of May of last year. So far I have placed 12 dogs into wonderful, loving homes where the majority of the people can’t believe how well behaved the dogs are. I crate train them during the day and when I get home they usually want to rush out of the crate before I can put a leash on them. I use this method of impulse control with letting them out of the crate to put their leash on and it works wonders. But, as is the case with a lot of things you teach dogs, you need to be patient. If you find yourself losing your patience then have your dog do something he knows well and when he does it , reward him and then you go calm yourself down before trying any more training. I have also been able to use this method when bringing my dog in after a walk. I have bad knees so I cannot afford for the dog to rush in ahead of me causing me to fall. My current foster dog actually sits outside and waits until I get into the house and say the word okay. Then she comes in and sits again on her own so I can take her leash off. Remember everyone, Chet’s methods are not immediate cures to problems. They are things you have to work on slowly and once the dog gets the hang of it, you will need to be consistent in what you train or else they will fall back into their old, unwanted routing.

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  30. David says:

    Thanks
    This technique works good too for when a dog is impatiently jumping up and down when you’re about to put on its leash to go for a walk. Or for when a dog barks as you’re bringing out its food. As soon as you see the unwanted behavior immediately stop and reverse your movement away towards the direction you were coming from.

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  31. Brenda says:

    Anne Boreden the difficulty is your Standard Poodles age, by 7-8 years the behaviour is set, but you can help to control it. Try false journeys so the second the behaviour starts, stop the car, and get out. So you will have to percifically plan the course you intend to drive.
    I think Standards are beautiful, and the second most intelligent dog in the dog world, top in Border Collie.

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  32. marcia french says:

    saw the video and enjoyed, however I do not have the same type of problem. He waits for me, always has with no training. He is where I am at all times unless I shut him out. He is a wonderful dog, except. can not stay calm… over excited when people come. has to jump on them, but never jumps on me. I feel I have tried everything you have told me, but strong pulls on the leash don’t work well either. My other problem is small running animals. (squirrels) He is very strong and I have to let go of the leash to save myself.(learned from experience)
    Right now I am going back to chapter one. But I hate to do it because he does love to go out and walk or play’

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  33. Angela says:

    My little Pom X starts barking the minute I put my lipstick on. I then have to go down a long staircase before I get to the front door where coat, boots, etc. Have to be put on. All the while Lola is barking and flying around like a maniac. How do I get her calm before I can even get ready to go out?

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  34. Belle Hays says:

    Amazing! I think I could succeed with my two dogs – both rescues and of unknown breeds, but my front door is up four steps and I am wheelchair bound, so am not a good candidate for your instructions. But I enjoy them all! anyway!

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  35. Tasha says:

    You asked for a question Chet, so here is mine. I have an 8 month old GoldenDoodle Lucy. She is smart, calm, responsive to “watch me”, and many commands and even when someone knocks on the door, she looks at me. I say Place and she trots off to her training mat and sits waiting until I open the door and let my guests or clients into the home. And then I am stumped! She will come when I call. Sit in front of the person, still calm… and then the madness begins. She literally works herself up into a frenzy. Squealing, jumping up on them and soft nibbling. I say Off and she will listen for a second and back off, making eye contact with me and then cant seem to control the behavior and jumps again. I put a toy in her mouth which helps with the mouthing but she can’t stop jumping. She loves people and all other dogs and repeats this hysterical behavior when outside and she sees other dogs. Other than these moments she is so calm and has great impulse control as evidenced by her waiting for her food quietly when I feed her. Its her loco love fest with people and other dogs that has me at my wits end not sure of what else to try. Yes, I have walked away when she is jumping outside…had people turn there backs and ignore her when she is jumping and have stood on her leash so she can’t jump. Nothing changes the level of excitement.. What am I missing?
    My hope was for Lucy to work as a therapy dog in my private practice but this level of high excitement would rule that out if I can figure out how to help her.

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  36. Lisa Everard says:

    I have 3 dogs, all of which are excitable – they wind each other up at door bell, jumping barking etc. Is there a way of training them all together as my time is limited and not sure if I have enough time to do them all seperately?
    many thanks
    Lisa

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  37. Gail says:

    My dog will wait quietly at the door because I have taught him not to barge through by quickly moving the door open and closed (and thereby catching his nose) until he sits and is calm. But he does not give me eye contact. Do I need to teach that in addition? He is 100 pounds of pure muscle.

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  38. Wendy Nydam says:

    I have the control at the door and can even leave it wide open with out them breaching the plane of the door, I have 2 Aussies and my problem is, when I release them they are so revved up, they burst out barking and the older one is above his threshold and grabs the younger one and occasionally it will cause an argument between them.

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  39. Tanya says:

    I have the hands off dog training program. My Winston is going through a defiant phrase and results in jumping/nipping/barking which part of the program should I concentrate on. I’ve currently started with redirection but would like additional advice.

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  40. I have a 3 year old chocolate lab who all of a sudden is afraid to walk on tile floor or a wood floor. Also if i let her outside with out a leash on she wont come back in but will cry n bark at the door but when you go to let her in she runs soni know put a short leash on her n she will go out and come inside with no problem. Has anyone ever had this problem with their dog?

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    Minette Reply:

    Slick floors can often hurt dog’s knees and back

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  41. Tomi Vensel says:

    LOL Jennifer, I know what you mean, I have 4! I am initially practicing one and a time, my plan is to then work with 2 at a time, varying the pair…then combination of 3…until the glorious day when this happens with 4. Honestly, training the other humans in the house to do this as well, is harder than training the dogs!

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  42. Wendy says:

    I have a Kelpie cross he is a lovely dog but he hates other dogs,
    When I take him for a walk and if I see another dog before him I walk the other way, but if he sees one even at a great distance he just goes mad pulling at his lead screaming so loud I’m sure people think I’m murdering him.
    I come home with blood running down my arms from the lead wrapping around them.I find myself not taking him for walks as it drives me crazy.Please Help.

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  43. Heidi says:

    I can’t wait to work on this with my dog. Clever is right! Thank you Chet! My question—–How can I incorporate this eye contact at the door trick and also have my dog let me go out first?

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  44. Linda H. says:

    My dog is really good but….when I take her out in public around other people and dogs, she just goes crazy and gets very difficult and impossible to control. As a result, I don’t take her anywhere. I’m afraid she’ll knock me down and I’ll break something. It’s also difficult to get a leash on her. Any suggestions would help. I purchased the impulse control vid but doesn’t really address the specific problems I have with her. She just turned 1 year old. She’s a shepherd/border collie mix.

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  45. Mike Burgio says:

    How do I train my dog to come when called?

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  46. Carrie says:

    My Yorki is one year old and tries (and sometimes succeeds) to get out the as
    soon as it is opened., runs across the street which scares me to death. My husband and I are in our middle seventies and it is difficult to chase and catch him. can you help? Is this video what I need to try? He won’t come when he is called……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

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    Minette Reply:

    Search our articles for help with teaching your dog to come when called.

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  47. Jessi says:

    Definitely going to follow your advice. The video is a very good helper. Good luck to all of us!!!

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  48. Thanks Chet – yes I’m using your method and it is working – my younger dog has picked it very quickly but his mum is a bit slower (or perhaps more independent!) but we’re certainly making progress – thanks again.
    Nigel

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  49. Mary Kay Falkner says:

    Please come and stay at my house. Not kidding. REALLY NEED YOU! Have 4 little dogs. 3 Yorkie’s and 1 very well mannered Shih-Tzu/Poodle mix. It’s insane here. I’m almost 70 years old and I don’t know what to do about it. Neither does my husband.

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