My 9 Week Old Puppy is Potty Trained

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puppy training, boxer training

How’s Potty Training at Your House? Would Your Boxer Pup Rather Play?

It is true! He hasn’t had an “accident” in over a week.  Do you want to know how I did it?

Let me explain!

First of all let me say that I got my puppy at 6 weeks and I must be adamant about discouraging anyone else from thinking of getting a puppy that young!  Don’t do it!  For more on that mistake read this article.

But to be truthful, that is the reason that he is potty trained at 9 weeks otherwise it would probably be 11 or so before we were on the right track.  But 11 weeks is nothing to scoff at!

How Often Do Puppies Need to Potty?

puppy training, rottweiler training

Rottweiler Puppies are Potty Machines!

Puppies are potty machines!

What goes in is contingent to what comes out!

When I first got my puppy, I was feeding him about 5 times per day because he was so little and he was extremely possessive and food aggressive so the more he ate, the less angry he was.

But feeding a dog this often, or giving them access to food all of the time means they need to go out more often.

When Puppies Need to Pee

  • First thing in the morning when they wake up
  • In the middle of the night, depending on age every 2-4 hours (at 6 weeks it was every 2 hours….I was like the walking dead, which is just one more reason not to get a pup so young!)
  • After naps
  • After exercise or playing
  • After drinking water
  • After eating
  • Last thing before bed

Does that sound like basically constantly?  Good!  Then I must have covered everything!

When Puppies Need to Poop

  • First thing in the morning
  • Last thing at night
  • Right after eating (this is why a specific schedule and not leaving food out helps).

Is that overwhelming?

Good, it should be!

Potty training is no easy matter, and honestly it is not about the puppy, it is about making sure you get your puppy outside often enough and control his environment.

puppy training

Start Right Away!

Why is My Puppy So Successful?

He is potty trained because I am extremely watchful of him and his behavior.

He is either in his crate for short periods of time, or he is on a tie down or a leash with me.

He DOES NOT have access to my house and for the brief moments that he has gotten that privilege he has usually snuck off to have an “accident”.

By keeping him in a small area he has become uncomfortable to “potty” in his space, so he has started to whine and pull toward the door when he has to go potty.

I must also monitor his actions, if he has a lot to drink, chances are he is going to need to go potty right afterward.

If he runs around like a maniac chasing and flinging his toys he is probably going to have to go potty!

AND, I ALWAYS go outside with him to make sure he is going potty.  It doesn’t matter if we are having torrential rain or if it is 50 below zero, I have to go out with him!  And, don’t give up and let him potty inside or you will be back to square one with your potty training!

Too many owners put their puppies outside and “expect” them to go potty, but instead the puppy sees a butterfly or a leaf and chases and plays and then comes back into the house and needs to go potty!

Or, he starts to go potty but gets distracted by a noise or something that visually floats past and so he stops mid flow to explore.  As an owner you must be present in order to recognize that he probably wasn’t finished with what he was doing and so he might need more coaxing to finish.

If I put my puppy outside alone and didn’t follow him around, and then if I allowed him access to my house would he have accidents?  Sure he would!  The reason he is doing well is because I am diligent in my mommy duties and I hate cleaning up puppy pee and poop.

Is my puppy running over and ringing the bell with his nose yet? No! That is the next step!

puppy training

Never Yell, Yelling will Set Your Puppy Back and Scare Him!

You wouldn’t bring a baby home from the hospital and expect not to have any accidents.  And, parents with toddlers know that kids also have good days and bad days, how then do we expect our animals to be perfect?

Puppies are like babies, they gain bladder control at different times and some are easier to potty train than others.

You have to go from one step, cleaning up the occasional accident and getting your puppy outside (i.e. cleaning diapers every few hours) to teaching your pup the next step.

It is now time to hook the bells up to my door knob and start the bell ringing behavior so he can let me know when he needs to go outside.

But he is still little, so chances are he will be on a leash and a tie down here in the house with me for many more weeks!  And, there is nothing wrong with that!

Eventually when he is no longer having accidents, wanting to chase my cats, biting the other dogs in the face, and chewing on everything I will give him the privilege of having access to the house.

But at my house, access and freedom is a privilege that needs to be earned and obedience and compliance is the key.

I don’t let my puppies develop terrible naughty behaviors because I know that fixing bad behavior is harder than simply avoiding them!  More potty training tips, click here.

 

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There are 115 Comments

  1. J.A says:

    I am an 66 year old disabled woman and have used pads because of this. I have a Terrier mix that is almost 5 years old, and she’s too active for me. I didn’t know what I was getting when I got her, I was told she was a chihuahua/yorkie mix and the Vet said no way, because of her weight. She weights 20 lbs. now. I got her at 9 weeks. I trained her to pads and she just uses them when she wants to, other times she pees on the bathroom floor where her pads are. I can say she is trained to the bathroom, completely. I know she knows better because she pees on the pad every day, several times, then the floor and some days she doesn’t pee on the floor at all. She never, never poops on the floor, only on her pads. She is stubborn, but very smart. I even taught her to crawl on the floor and pull my socks off for goodness sakes. She not only fetches the ball, she throws it. She uses eye contact, she’s learned to wait, and if asked to “leave it”, she won’t eat what is put down for her until she’s told to. She even looks at me for permission a lot of times, if I don’t tell her to wait. Very smart dog! I have had 100% sucess in puppy pad training puppies that were 8 weeks old when I got them. I know how to do it but this dog just pees on the pad when she wants to. I’m only lucky she can be trusted in all other rooms of the apartment. I don’t think there is any hope because she acts like she wants to do this for some reason. I know that sounds weird but I also think she does this to get back at me for not feeding her what I eat every time. When I finish eating she looks at me like, don’t I get anything? If I feed her people food she refuses to eat her food and if I don’t have anything to feed her, she waits but will usually eat later. I know I’m too old to have her, she needs a family that can play with her a lot.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Dogs don’t do things to “get back at us”, they are simple and kind beings.

    I don’t recommend potty pads for many of these reasons.

    [Reply]

    Joyce Reply:

    Thanks for your reply. Yes, they are precious to us and I love dogs. I love your site and your tips on training. You make many things clear and easy to understand. Sometimes people are unable to take thier dogs out so we have no choice, if we want to have a dog. I am alone and she is my baby girl, she needs more than a disabled person because I can’t do many things with her and she is very active. The good things she gets is love, home indoors, food to eat and all the care I can give. I’ve always kept my dogs all thier lives. I hate it when people get them and decide they don’t want them anymore and give them away when they don’t know how well they are going to be cared for, taken to a shelter or even cruelly dropped off some where! We have a responsibility to these beautiful animals.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I’ve spent my career or a good portion of it working and training service dogs for people with disabilities and we still expected them to get out and get them exercise every day, many of which were in tow with a wheelchair.

    As far as potty training I would just use the indoor doggy grass, which is much less confusing than potty pads.

  2. Kerikissane says:

    I have a dog Is almost 1 years old need help training her trying to teach you to let me know but it’s not working and I got a crate I go out but she hates it and go to bed ideas on how to help me

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/potty-train-truth-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  3. Mary says:

    Hi,

    I’ve got a 3 month old Italian Greyhound. I’d read that they are notoriously hard to potty train but our pup was going consistently in his box (lined with puppy pads) after a week. He’ll even bring it to our attention if we haven’t changed out the pad after 3-4 pees so he can pee on a “clean” pad. We praise him and give him treats every time he poops and pees when we catch it to continue reinforcing this positive behavior. However, he had gotten into the habit of grabbing his poop out of the box, eating it and basically making a mess by leaving “crumbs” everywhere, especially in his bed. We don’t know what to do about this!
    A common occurrence is I get up to get ready for work, he pees, I go shower, he poops, and when I come out I clean up his poop. Then I put out some food and we play until I leave (at which point I give him a few treats and leave while he’s distracted). My boyfriend will wake up a few hours later, and when he comes out of the shower, the pup will have pooped again and left pieces of it everywhere.
    We have bitter green apple spray that we’ve been using to get him to only chew on toys which has worked super well (we don’t even have to use it, only show the bottle to get him to stop), and I’ve considered spraying his poop but I don’t want to leave his poop out like an offering to eat it. Also, this poop chewing/spreading happens sometimes when we both leave the house. Our apartment is small and he only has access to the large living area (and an enclosed backyard deck) so we don’t crate him. (At night we move his bed to our bedroom and he sleeps fine with us; when it’s time to be “up” we move his bed to the living area. He’ll even get out of bed to go potty and then go right back to sleep!)

    He just finished his shots yesterday so we’ve gotten the okay to take him out, I suspect that maybe he just needs more exercise? He has a million toys which might also explain why he only sometimes eats poop when we’re both gone (boredom?). This is pretty much the only unwanted behavior he’s exhibited but boy is it a doozy. Let’s just say, I walk around the house barefoot. -_- Any advice?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, teach him to poop outside and then clean it up right away.

    [Reply]

  4. Kacie says:

    My 8 year old has some mental disabilities and isnt completely potty trained he goes in the same place everytime so we started putting pads down so its easier to clean up is there anything else i can do to help him he goes outside also…. i have a 9 week old puppy who lets me know she has to go but today she went in the same place my older dog goes and i know thats because of the scent… also do you have any idea how i get my older dog to like the puppy more

    [Reply]

  5. Sara says:

    It’s illegal to have a puppy at 6 weeks it has to be at least 8 weeks like my new puppy

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Not in all states, only some

    [Reply]

  6. Abby says:

    Do I carry or walk my puppy outside to potty?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Walk! Puppies need to learn to walk on their own!

    [Reply]

  7. Bella says:

    Me and my husband got our husky wolf pup at 5 weeks. Obviously at first she had a couple house accidents because it was just me watching her, my husband is in the military, and then me and puppy moved to Oklahoma now she is peeing EVERYWHERE. We thought she was very well potty trained. But we are now renting and we have all carpet so this is not good as you would know. She is 14 weeks and we are having a tough tough time potty training her we really need some help and advice so if anyone can give us like a detailed way to help us solve this problem that would be wonderful. She also has been peeing in her kneel at night and then drinking it all up. I know this can’t be healthy for dog and we’ve tried to put a pottt pad in the kennel when she goes to sleep but she chews everything up to shreds. So if anyone has some advise that would be great!

    [Reply]

  8. Camille says:

    My border collie/lab is 11 weeks. She hasn’t had an accident inside for a week! But we do have some issues. When we take her out she will start to poop and stop halfway and run back to us. We have to tell her to poop probably three more times until she actually has gotten it all out. We are dumbfounded because she has not done this before. We thought it was just in the morning because we feed her breakfast after she goes but we switched it around and she still continued to stop mid poop. Help! I need advise.

    [Reply]

  9. Susan says:

    I got my toy poodle puppy just shy of 5 months. His breeder said he was pee pad trained. (I live in Manhattan and plan to ONLY use pee pads, not out of doors.) The first week he had several accidents but after 10 days ONLy pees on the pad. However, he only poops on the pad one out of 10 times, otherwise on the wood floor or rug. I keep his pads clean so as not to discourage him. I reward him when he poops on the pad. Any further advice?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/indoor-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  10. Joanne Gardner says:

    I have a 12 week old beagle and she is wonderful. A puppy, yes, and needs
    direction on many issues. I do crate her and let her run in her playpen for a bit. Pllus a little in the house under my supervision.
    I have been monitoring her pee and poop habits which she does in the crate on
    an old towel. That being said I now am starting to potty train her as she just
    finished her shots. I couldn’t before because I have many of nature’s critters
    roam outside. I take her out on her leash She eats grass, dirt whatever is in
    the enclosed outside pen. I use all the cues and don’t holler but still doesn’t
    work. Bring her inside and put her in her crate and she goes. I am spinning my wheels. I have had dogs before but this little one has got me beat. I know
    it takes time. I thought well I would withhold treats until she went .In that way,
    she would be more apt to go outside.I know it is going to take time but I am
    wondering if I could try something else that would be more effective. Thanks
    for any suggestions.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If you weren’t taking her outside until now you taught her to go potty inside and in the crate… this will now be a bad habit you must break. Habits take a lot of time to break.

    [Reply]

  11. leanne redman says:

    we got a 8 weeks old pug puppy the breeder said he goes to toilet on newspaper. but he just pees and poohs everywhere in ours. we crate him at night and when we are out otherwise he only has access to the dining room. we started trying to take him in our back garden after he eats to pooh out there and praise him when he does and get up in the night to let him out to pee on the paper, but he still waits till we put him back in crate then does it in there i am so tired. I have read loads of stuff online but am confused on the best way to toilet train him. we started giving treats now he keeps peeing a little just to get them. we have never had dogs before only cats.

    [Reply]

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