How A Tennis Ball Could Cost You Hundreds if Not Thousands of Dollars….

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Puppy With Tennis Ball, puppy training, golden retriever training

This Golden Retriever Puppy is worn out!

One of the major roles I play in writing articles for this blog is educating my readers.  We also like to provide fun stories, tips and a peer group of people who are having the same questions or troubles.

Recently I was flipping through dog videos on YouTube.

What caught my eye over and over as I watched numerous videos was the use of regular felt tennis balls.

I am definitely an advocate of using toys in your training program to build drive and also to add fun to regular dog training and you can read more about that here and here.

But it has long been known in the dog training world that regular tennis balls are dangerous!Dog With Tennis Ball, puppy training, golden retriever training

A large, strong dog with a powerful jaw can split a tennis ball in a matter of minutes if not seconds!  And those halves can be swallowed quiet effortlessly.  Even a whole tennis ball can be easily swallowed by large or giant dogs!

Always make sure that the toys you are training with are large enough and safe for your dog!  Play comes with excitement and excitement sometimes comes with some abnormal chewing and sometimes grabbing and possessive behaviors.  Make sure that your dog does not choke when he runs around celebrating with his newly won toy!

The fuzz or felt from the regular tennis ball can also be ripped off and swallowed and like swallowing the whole ball, this can be a danger.
The fuzz does not break down in your dog’s stomach or in his intestines and if he swallows enough or any other foreign body it can get stuck in his stomach.

puppy training, tennis balls bad for dogs

No Felt is Safe even if it is Marketed for Your Dog!

Stomach and bowel obstruction surgery is not only painful for your dog it is also expensive and potentially deadly!

And, last but certainly not least, is the fact that the glue used to glue the felt to these balls can break down the enamel on your dog’s teeth.

You can imagine how acidic glue must be, and some dogs chew and chew and chew and chew on a tennis ball, this makes the glue wet and then with the motion of the chewing the abrasiveness of the felt damages your dog’s teeth.

Even when your dog releases his ball, the glue remains on your dog’s teeth slowly and steadily breaking down the enamel!

There are sooo many reasons not to use regular tennis balls!

Instead find an adequately sized rubber ball!

puppy training, tennis balls bad for dogs

Rubber and Large Enough for Safety are the Only Balls to Choose!

The “Chuck It” brand sells a rubber ball that is the same size as a regular tennis ball and only a bit heavier and it also floats!

My dogs would prefer a ball over a treat any day and the sight of their “Chuck It” will send their bodies into anticipation shivers!  There is no reason not to use a ball, or a ball on a string, just make sure it is not your classic tennis ball or even the “doggy tennis balls” that you can get at your local pet retail store.

Just doing this simple task will make your dog healthier and happier!

 

 

 

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There are 94 Comments

  1. Bill Robertson says:

    I had a glow in the dark Chuck it ball that recently was lost when we were playing with it (it went over a fence into a closed pubic pool).
    I bought a new ball to replace the old one. But my dog is rejecting the replacement ball.
    My question is, can a dog differentiate one ball from another if they know which one is theirs, and if so, how do I make her understand the new one is hers too.
    My dog is an 8 year old Pug Beagle mix that we rescued a year ago. We recently discovered she likes to chase the ball, and that she is more obedient because of there ward of playing ball.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    sure they have great sense of smell.

    But just like a child who accidentally loses or ruins a favorite toy or blanket… if there is nothing else to play with you will eventually revert to playing with something new.

    [Reply]

  2. Wanda says:

    My 5 month old searches out pieces of tennis balls that have been cut up by lawn mowers, at a local park. I’m constantly taking these pieces out of his mouth! Very frustrating. I don’t know how much he may have ingested before I’ve gotten it from him.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep him on a leash and don’t allow the behavior. It could kill him

    [Reply]

  3. Sherrie says:

    My 82lb put 11yrs old was chewing on her Kong tennis fabric squeaky ball. She, for the first time ever swallowed a price of felt! This was 2 nights ago. She’s acting fine and pooping good but I am concerned. I haven’t seen any of it in her poop and I pick it up after she goes so I would know. What should I look for if it gets stuck inside her? Will it deteriorate? Will it come out in her poop? Now I am a wreck. She has cushings so I already have high vet bills for her meds and tests so I can’t afford to bring her into vet. Help!

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  4. Victoria says:

    My 11 month old spaniel does the same. He had an edoscopy yesterday to remove the rubber from his stomach before it caused an intestinal blockage (which he had a few months back). Luckier this time around. He won’t be going out the house without a basket muzzle on from now on. Yes it may be tough to begin with but it will be the best thing we ever do for him.

    [Reply]

  5. Lauren J says:

    Our 5 year old Doberman is obsessed with tennis balls. She actually prefers the Chuck-it balls, so we have given her those exclusively. Her teeth are so worn down and one of her canine teeth actually had to be removed due to the tooth being so worn down that the root canal was exposed and became infected. This happened even though she cannot chew through the balls, there is no glue and no felt. :( I’m afraid that taking her ball away will affect her quality of life. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    unless you use the balls with the glue, the ball should not be the cause of that. There is no way something soft could cause that kind of damage. However, tennis balls can be swallowed or choked on ending in death.

    [Reply]

  6. william mcniff says:

    Dog at vets right now with parts of tennis balls in stomach and intestines. Sick all day. I think we should ban them at the dog bark.

    [Reply]

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