Best Dog Training Tip Everyone Ignores

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Best Dog Training Tip Everyone Ignores

best dog training tipsIt is interesting, but I suppose it is human nature to ignore certain things.

I find that people often ignore things that they think will add more difficulty to their lives.

But, the truth is there is this ONE SIMPLE dog training tip that will actually make life with a dog much, much easier; eventually.

Keeping a young, new, or untrained dog on a leash (which sounds incredibly complicated) in the house will actually lessen your frustration and need for training in the end.

The Problem

best dog training tipsPeople come home, open the door and let the new furry companion tumble in and have free reign.

Some forward thinkers will baby gate off certain areas of the house, yet still leave the remainder of the house open for exploration.

Truthfully, I used to do that too.  I mean, it is how 99% of us were taught to bring a new animal into the home.

But, when I started taking adult dogs from animal shelters and training them to be service dogs, I had some eye opening experiences.

Walls were chewed, food stolen, and expensive things ruined in what seemed like the blink of an eye.

Let’s face it, an adult dog can chew things up much quicker than a distracted puppy.

If I was going to stay married and have nice things while living my dream I was going to have to find another way!

So, I started training right away by keeping them on leash.

If I couldn’t watch them, they went into a crate.

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It was like Magic

I have to admit, it was tedious and frustrating, but it was like magic!

If the dog grabbed my shoes, the table, my glasses, a bag of chips… I was RIGHT THERE and I could stop him.

If he jumped on the counter; I could pluck him off.

If he tried to chase the cat; I could stop him.

If he began chewing the carpet; I would notice!

He learned impulse control and manners by default!

He learned that it simply wasn’t even worth his effort to do naughty things, and it literally forced me to take IMMEDIATE ACTION!

I mean it is pretty ridiculous to think you would glance down and see him eating your shoes and just let him continue.

The leash keeps him from wandering throughout the house without supervision and it keeps me from being lazy.

Ever been laying on the sofa and you “think” you see or hear your dog doing something naughty but you are so comfortable you don’t want to get up?

If your dog is tethered to you or what you are sitting on it is virtually impossible to let your dog get away with bad behavior.

And after a few weeks he has been conditioned to hang out with you, and you have taught him some manners and obedience by default!

Win! Win!

How to Make it Work

best dog training tipsBut, you have to be able to make it work without feeling like prison.

Some people are horrified when they think of a dog being on a leash or a tether all the time.

And, I admit that the immediate visual image it brings is not one of contentment and happiness until you realize that you must provide the dog with things to do in their space.

I often utilize a 10ft or so tether in my living room attached to the sofa.

And the dog is provided with all kinds of toys, treats and bones to entertain himself with when he is bored.

I would never expect a dog to spend long periods of time with literally no stimulation.

You will be amazed at how quickly you notice when the sound of what he is doing changes to something unknown or naughty.

You will be amazed at how quickly you notice when he begins to do the potty dance to signal you that he has to go potty outside.

And, you will be amazed at how easily he trains when you control him, his environment and his behavior!

It literally alleviates dozens of bad behaviors from ever taking root!

One day you will thank me for such a simple and easy tip to follow!

Tip

Never, ever, ever leave him alone on a tether.

If you can’t take him with you, put him outside for a moment or put him in his crate until you can!

 

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There are 90 Comments

  1. Tuto says:

    It work with my Yellow Lab

    [Reply]

  2. Adam says:

    We let our 9 month old English Black Lab roam between the living room and kitchen. We never let our other English Black Lab have that much free range but now we let him and he sure has been able to teach himself some bad manners here lately he’s 2-1/2 years old. Would I benefit by putting them both on leashes?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes! THis will teach him what your expectations of him are while controlling his bad behavior.

    [Reply]

  3. Shira says:

    I closed all the doors to all the rooms when I took him up to the porch to hang laundry. I am in a talk skinny home. The first times, without a leash, he peed on my carpet. Today I brought him on his leash and he was great. Kept him busy but beyond reach of clothes basket and the carpet.

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  4. Peggy says:

    I have done this with all three of my Great Danes including the 4-month-old one that I have now. It is such a great idea though my current one howls and moans when I can’t have him with me. He’s great being tethered to me but if I have to put him in a pen because I can’t be tethered, he howls, moans, and/or whines the entire time. Any ideas since I can’t be tethered to him 24/7? Thanks for your tips and info! They are so helpful and am continuing to learn with each new dog I get.

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  5. Belinda Adams says:

    If im leaving the room for just a minute or two, i leave her there. Any longer and she comes looking for me. If i have to leave her for more time i put her out side. I took her for a two week holiday to tasmania where she was on a leash by my side the whole time. I can read her very well.

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  6. David Taylor says:

    This tip works great think !!!!!!

    [Reply]

  7. Gail alford says:

    We are planning on adopting a very active Sheltie Pom mix who is six years old. Apparently he is used to running through his foster home playing with toys and generally dashing about.
    I thank you for this tip. It sounds exactly what we will need to do.

    [Reply]

  8. Patti Jones says:

    Leash is only way to train a pup, I normally keep my Labradoofle leashes to me. Just last night my hubby suggested to let her have a little freedom within minutes she was looking trouble! I had her in doggie pants becaif her submissive peeing if not I would have had a wet carpet spot

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  9. Gigi says:

    I’m looking for help…..I am a 1st time dog owner. I rescrued my pup at 6weeks a year ago…she is house trained to o e spot and on paper but I want to train her to go outside…any suggestions??
    Also ..Im not sure what you mean to use the lease in the house to train bad behavior b/c my dog is a wall crewer.

    [Reply]

  10. Rixane says:

    When Rico first came from shelter he was n leash and with me or in crate at all times. I had gradually given him moe freedom without being aware of it and his prgress stopped and he seemed to forget everything he had been doing so well. My frustration with the backsliding in training was increasing then your email came and caused an “Aha” moment. Rico is back on leash and amazingly has remembered his manners. I am more relaxed and he seems more secure and focused. My bracing mobility trained service dog has not had to step in and correct Rico’s risky behaviors and everybody is working as a team again. I had suspected that something in my behavior had changed to cause disruption and it turned out to be such a simple lapse. Now Rico may be able to continue into bracing mobility training, a specialized type of mobility service, as originally planned.

    [Reply]

  11. Jackie says:

    We have two six month old Morkies that are well behaved, but they constantly bark at every little thing. Any suggestions on how to keep them from barking?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    search my articles for barking and quiet

    [Reply]

  12. Gail alford says:

    We were blessed. The rescue group we applied to declined us because of my age. After two months of e mailing and phone calls and applications to rescue groups we went to a pPetmart sponsored rescue day from a pound and came home with a beautiful gentle white Escamo mix.. She is only 9 months old housetrained and intelligent. I watch all your video and find all your tips right on.

    Thank you so much.

    [Reply]

  13. Kay Allred says:

    Thanks to my friend Linda Diesel for referring me to you..

    [Reply]

  14. Ann Lamon says:

    My <2 yr old GS is in the house with me when I'm not working, on leash attached to the sofa or dragging it. She only minds me, treats my husband and the cats like a toy. She has moved the sofa with her lungeing. She paws and jumps on the cats and us. We are bloody! Ready to give her up or put her down. Nothing you've shown me is working. Nothing works for more than one time and she starts up again. There is no progress as soon as we walk away she's back to whatever. We can't pet her, walk near her without using force, take her in and out without injury, you'd think she'd learn the drill! She knows but wont do anythong on first command except for me, and not even me most of the time. I'm tired of yelling, and giving commands 6 times, a buzz collar works only when its on. I'm already a member and having no success.

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  15. Barbara says:

    My Golden Retriever is 3 yo. We’ve had her from a puppy. She has never been in a crate. Had 2 pee accidents and one poop! Is allowed to get on one couch (on our porch) and makes no attempt to get on any other furniture. We have 2 dog beds and at night she sleeps on one of those. Has never touched anything in the in the house .. plays only with her own toys. When we go out she gets on ‘her’ couch and is in that same spot when we get back. Ok .. she’s not perfect! We have one huge problem .. Jumping up and excessive crazy love for humans!

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  16. Wallace says:

    Thanks and it do work I’ve notice a big difference

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  17. Carolyn says:

    This sounds great, however I have 2 GS, one is 21 months old, the other is 5 months old. Should I try to keep both on lease and attached to me?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, or choose the worse and start with that dog and when you have a handle on that, start with dog #2

    [Reply]

  18. Minette says:

    Dogs are as different as people. Cookie cutter training doesn’t work on all kids or all dogs. The tips are proof that the training DOES work

    [Reply]

  19. Mike Sawyer says:

    We have a rescue Chihuahua/miniature pinscher (4 yrs old). No trouble with his urinating in house but can’t break him of going #2 inside. Any suggestions on handling this problem?

    [Reply]

  20. I’ve got attached new puppy she is 9 weeks old how is the best way to train her. She is in the bitting stage also how is the best way to potty training? Can you please help me.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    use the search bar and search articles for “land shark”

    [Reply]

  21. Ann says:

    I’ve always done this and it works!
    But with this last puppy, a 4 month old, 28 lb lab/boxer mix who is incredibly strong I have had to be more careful. I tethered her to the leg of my bed so I could wash my face and brush my teeth. She decided to chase a cat and she ripped the entire footboard and legs off my king size bed in one fell swoop! Good thing she had a harness on and not a collar.

    [Reply]

  22. Louise says:

    My Dog is good as gold dog training classes and even pack walks but when me and him on a walk he sometimes kicks off at bigger dogs any advice

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  23. Fran says:

    My yellow lab, Moxie urinates on floor by cat’s litter box when I leave the house . When I come home snd see the urine, he hands his head down and won’t look at me. Is this behavior separate anxiety? How can I correct this behavior?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    no, it is not separation anxiety.

    He is probably urinating there because it already smells like urine.

    I would crate him while you are gone.

    [Reply]

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