Myth Buster: Walking is the Best Way to Exercise Your Dog

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Thanks cutest page for the photo

Thanks cutest page for the photo

I love busting myths about dogs and dog training. There are so many… sometimes I don’t know where to begin! It seems most we have grown up knowing about dogs and their behavior is wrong. Think a wagging tail means a happy dog? WRONG!!!  Click here for more on that.

Think your dog loves to be hugged?

Thanks lesserville life for the photo

Thanks lesserville life for the photo

Chances are you are WRONG  for more on that click here  (FYI and update this dog still HATES being grabbed, hugged and kissed and sometimes gives a throaty growl; who would blame him) Think all dogs must stay off the furniture or they may conquer the world? WRONG!!!  Click here for more on that Think the taste of blood will turn your dog into a vampire? WRONG (this is such a silly idea anyway)  for more on that click here And, One more and probably the most dangerous?  Think your dogs should fight it out? WRONG!!!!  Not unless you want one or two or more dead dogs and huge vet bills; for more on that click here But let’s face it we have heard them ALL…. QUITE FREQUENTLY

Thankfully This One is Not so Dangerous

Well, if you think about it and process it down it can be just as dangerous because dogs die every day due to lack of exercise and understanding their needs. You see; a walk is not exercise for a dog. A walk for us is like a trip to the zoo for your dog. You may be huffing and puffing and getting your 30 minutes of cardio but your dog is on a sightseeing stroll/ tour of your neighborhood looking at the birds, watching the neighborhood kids play, counting cats hiding in bushes, li. You may even be hiking 14 miles up a mountain, but chances are your dog is still dawdling along using the basics of his athletic muscles and hunting squirrels and keeping an ear out for deer or lizards.

The Truth of the Matter

Thanks Delco Pet Care for the Photo

Thanks Delco Pet Care for the Photo

I don’t know how many times I have to say this…. But I guess you have to repeat the important things time and time again.

YOUR DOG IS AN ATHLETE

I don’t care if you have a Chihuahua, a Greyhound, a Lab, a Golden, an English Bulldog (okay a little less athlete), or a Shih Tzu… your dog is a born athlete. And, so I am going to get slightly technical for you so that you can understand your dog in a healthier way. So let’s understand our muscles! We all have fast twitch and slow twitch muscles. Our fast twitch muscles are our anaerobic, they are the muscle fibers that allow us to have short bursts of energy and speed, but that speed doesn’t last long. Think about if you are being chased by someone, it is your fast twitch muscles that come into play.  Sprinters use more fast twitch muscles.  These are also the muscles that get super sore after a new work out. I won’t get into type IIa and IIb fast twitch muscle fibers you can google it if you are interested in changing your body and you and your dog’s work out. Slow twitch muscle fibers are the ones that most marathon runners have worked hard to build.  They are efficient at using oxygen to convert into fuel.  They fire more slowly but last for a much longer time helping athletes run, bike or swim for hours

The Debate

The debate amongst athletes is that you can change some fast twitch muscles to slow twitch muscles to improve your endurance and deal less with fatigue. Of course, if that is true, it takes time and dedication and hours of exercise and training.

Your Dog

Thanks a place to love dogs for the photo

Thanks a place to love dogs for the photo

Your dog was born an athlete he has more slow twitch muscles than fast twitch muscles and if they can indeed to switched over, he is the expert. He can go from running 3 miles one week to running 6 the next without showing even the slightest bit of fatigue or muscle soreness. Swim him for 2 hours straight and he might sleep the rest of the day, but the next day he will be ready to hit it again. You swim for 2 hours (with no conditioning) and you might as well bring a bed pan to bed with you. See the difference?

Your Dog was BORN AN ATHLETE

He mocks your walk around the block or your jog to the park. His body is in total control and so his mind is scanning the trees and shrubs for something else to do so he can be entertained in his boredom. When was the last time you went for a run and decided to solve some math problems in your head because you were bored?  Probably never.

So How Do You Compete?

So how do you compete with such an athlete? I personally like to hook mine up to my bike and make them run at their (almost) full speed (I don’t want to die so there must be some control) and I run them down to a lake where they can swim for an hour or more… talk about tired dogs. OR…. This is for those of you who don’t have a lateral recumbent trike or a lake nearby; I play games of retrieve with a chuck it or flying squirrel or a jolly egg. I make my dogs lay down, sit, find heel position, stand, stay, high five…. Well you get the picture; before I throw his ball, his squirrel or kick his chuck it. 30 minutes of these kinds of calisthenics (think P90X or Insanity) and full body work outs and you have a tired dog physically and mentally.   If 30 minutes doesn’t do it, go for an hour or more.  Work till his tongue is hitting his knees (just kidding don’t overdo it or give him heat exhaustion). The more obedience you add the more tiring it is, so add lots of obedience and skills to his regimen and you’ll realize that walking is not the best way to exercise your dog!

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There are 68 Comments

  1. Russell Niermeyer says:

    I have a question. Our young Shih Tzu male is about 1 1/2 years old and a great dog except he wants to pull up the grass with his teeth. He is quite strong for his size and hard to pull off when he is doing this. How do we break him of this habit?
    An answer would be appreciated.

    Russ

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep him on a leash outside so you can control and teach him.

    Also he needs more exercise… this sounds like boredom and he has found something he thinks is fun… if you exercise him he will be too tired to continue doing that.

    [Reply]

  2. janet amighi says:

    Great article. Any hints on how much ball throwing is too much? My 2 year old min poodle loves to run (on trails,running from other dogs, chasing balls etc, but soon he is breathing heavily, tongue way out, and I’m afraid to throw the next ball. How much is too much? Or are the sit down sit breaks enough to allow air back in the body?

    Thanks, looking forward to you offering another course.

    janet

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I worry mostly about puppies and repetitive movements because it can cause joint and growth problems.

    Otherwise it is more about heat and common sense. If it is above 70 degrees the dog should have access to shade or a pool or body of water, otherwise the dog can suffer from heat exhaustion.

    And, utilize breaks as you see the tongue grow. Some dogs will literally run and play until they have a seizure… most won’t but some will. So as you see signs of exhaustion take a break.

    [Reply]

  3. Anne Malsbary says:

    Lucy (my Havanese) loves her early morning 2 mile walk but you’re right. It’s not enough for her so we do the fetch thing and sit, lie down, up and dance thing but if all that is not enough, she does her own exercise which is racing through the family room to the living room to the dining room to the family room etc about 5 times. And again, you are right, her tongue is hanging down to her knees. I’m worn out watching her.

    [Reply]

  4. Nancy says:

    My dog was abused I got her from the pound at four months she is afraid of everything she’s afraid of the bike how can we get her to not be afraid of the bike. Also she is afraid of noise vacuum cleaner bags any help on that matter so I can exercise her better I’ve had 9 knee surgeries 2 knee replacement so running is not an option she is a big dog she is 1 1/2 yr old

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    work at her pace, and read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/understanding-desensitization-dog-training/

    [Reply]

  5. karen thomason says:

    My dog will swim for 2 hours straight, but I can’t take him very often. So, I try throwing his toys, which he loves to fetch. But, when he brings it back, he won’t give it to me. He wants to play tug of war, which I won’t do. I’ve tried ignoring him until he drops it and throwing another toy, but nothing seems to work. Any ideas?

    [Reply]

    Vickie Reply:

    When he brings it back, give him a small high value treat. throw the toy again. Reward each return with the treat. Quickly, he will bring it back and drop it at your feet to get the treat. Have fun

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Use two toys read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-retrieve-play-drive/

    [Reply]

  6. will hobbs says:

    I am the happy owner of a 3 year old mal. I run her on with my adult trike about 3 miles every day, shich she loves. but can not get her into the water. What is the best way to train her to take the water plunge. Have seen her mother jump from low flying helo into the water, but can not convince her to join me in the pool.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Find a beach to wade out into; and build her toy drive. most Mals… if you are talking Malinois will do anything for their toys

    [Reply]

  7. Mary Kay Falkner says:

    I have a Yorkie puppy. He is so not potty trained and while I was in the shower last night he tee teed on the beautiful antique oak hardwood floors at least 21 times. Now, how could he have that much water in him to do that? Seriously, I can’t potty train him. I’ve done the clicker and he’s afraid of it. I’ve done the bell on the door and he’s afraid of that. He’s always doing something bad. I scold him, but he still doesn’t get it. What am I going to do? Please help! I ordered your tapes, but they are pretty slow to tell you the truth. Kinda like listening to Martha King about piloting an airplane. I fall asleep, but I’m now a pilot. No help from her. I would have thought you would have started it out with potty #1 training because that’s most important when you have nice floors. I have 3 other good dogs that were not hard to train, but I’ve never seen anything like this puppy. His name is Hank, by the way. He was born Dec. 2014 so he’s almost 9 months old thereabouts. I wanted him trained before we went on vacation, but don’t think it’s gonna happen. Please help me.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Use a crate and a leash and you will find it a lot easier.

    [Reply]

    Jeannie Reply:

    Definitely crate training. Your dog will complain. Ignore that. Make the crate just big enough for the dog to turn around and lie down, no bigger. Take the dog out, go immediately outside and wait until the dog potties outside. If the dog has an accident, take them outside, then crate them and clean up without having them watch you. Reward every success outside, ignore every accident inside. Do not scold or pay any attention to the dog. Give them a little while, then take outside again. With some dogs you have to be more persistent. Do not leave the dog running loose unsupervised, ever – you’re setting him (and yourself) up for failure.

    [Reply]

    Ellen Reply:

    I am so not an expert, but one of our friends said they were having a terrible time trying to housebreak/potty train their pup. Turned out he had a urinary tract infection.

    [Reply]

    Sharon Reply:

    We had issues with our dog when a pupply with potty training. After a vet visit and collection of urine (the vet collected via syringe so was sterile) we found out she had a very bad UTI. It took some time (months)on our part and medication but once the UTI was completely healed we had her potty trained in no time at all. We trained her with the bells on the door.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Thank you for sharing Sharon :)

    [Reply]

    Kathleen Reply:

    I have a toy poodle. He got the doggie door right away and I saw him Run outside and go potty. I immediately declared him a genius ! Then the next time he ran out turned around ran back in and pottied on the carpet. Not a genius after all It just takes time one day it just clicked and he never had another accident in the house. He’s 5 months old now and the perfect dog.

  8. Karen Rayson says:

    Greyhounds are amazing pets for everyone but are especially well suited to any owner who is not an athlete. I’m retired and adopted my retired racing greyhound a year ago. She runs the perimeter of our fenced yard at full speed (about 45 mph) multiple times every morning for about 45 seconds. Later, we go on a couple 20 minute walks through the neighborhood during the day. She’s very calm and well behaved in the house, spends time playing with her toys and will ask to go outside if she wants to run. They are very smart so it’s a challenge to find new commands or tricks to occupy her mind. She HATES the water so swimming is out.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I love Greyhounds :)

    [Reply]

  9. Amber says:

    After typing out a whole question I decided that I knew the answer to that. So, I’m going to ask on a different matter:

    My lab had a wonderful sit/stay and down/stay. I trained her as best as I could and she soaked it all up. I then showed every member of my family. They were impressed. Next thing I knew, they were telling her to stay. That wouldn’t have been a bad thing had they not ignored every word I said about her release word, “okay”. They let her get up whenever she wanted. Now all of my hard work has dissolved. I’ve started using a hand signal in addition to the command hoping that maybe that will help. It’s still not as good as it once was.

    This was a command I relied on even more than her recall and now I’m not sure if I can trust it. Once I was certain I could stop her from a dead run toward the very busy road and hold her there until I could get a leash on her now I’m not sure that even in our confined backyard that I could keep her still long enough for me to approach her.

    What should I do? Should I change my command or try once again to beat into their minds that they NEED to tell her okay and not let her get up until they say okay?

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    Amber, I would continue your training. You dog will remember what you expect after working with her a few times alone. The children (or anyone else who is counter-productive need to leave the dog alone during this time). Once you have her back “on track” slowly work with the others showing them what is expected both from the dog and the humans. There must be a consequence for those who do not do what is expected and until the humans conform, I would limit their interactions with the dog.

    We had similar issues with our English Setter and family & friends visiting. The resolution was that we kept the dog away from people when they came to visit. We did give her the opportunity to sniff ans say hello while on leash, as socialization is also important, but then she went to her kennel. This kept us on track for training and also helped us to have a more relaxed social visit (not having to worry about what everyone was doing right or wrong with the puppy.)

    I hope this helped. Best of luck to you!

    [Reply]

  10. Jen Jelly says:

    It’s amazing how much I underestimated the ability of dogs growing up until we got a Lab. He was the most amazing athlete; always read to go run, swim, retrieve, play, run around. They’ve been bred to work with us for hours on end, and now we sometimes expect them to just be nice couch companions.

    With my dog now we do long walks a couple times a day (for the warm up) and then we mix in either frisbee, swimming, scent games, or biking (as you do with her tagging alongside). It depends on the weather.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Excellent! There should be more dog owners like you :)

    [Reply]

  11. Ginger says:

    I have two mature Pekingese and am myself in my 70s and arthritic. Recently my vet called my attention to their being overweight (they are hairy dogs, after all). and told me the risks that increase as they approach aging. Diet changes haven’t shown dramatic changes and we agreed that they need to move. But how?
    We live in the country and love the outdoors. Long walks are not something I can do. We do have a pool, and I am a swimmer, but I’ve been understandably apprehensive about trying them in them in the water, though they are clipped in the summer so the heavy coats would not weigh them down. But those noses…
    Help, please.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Swimming is good exercise so is playing chase or fetch.

    However most dogs that need to lose weight need a sincere decrease in their diet. measure what you feed them and cut back by 1/4 at a time. Add fresh or frozen green beans to their diet if they seem hungry.

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/helping-prevent-treat-canine-obesity/

    [Reply]

  12. len houghton says:

    Should you spey a dog early or can you have a litter and then spey.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Spaying your dog early reduces their risk of mammary cancer (breast cancer and yes dogs get it too) by over half.

    Plus there are shelters full of puppies that get euthanized every day because there are too many puppies and not enough good homes.

    I have very expensive dogs that compete and have many titles and I still spay and neuter.

    [Reply]

  13. irina giyaur says:

    What is the best age for the puppy to be neute? I have Coton de Tuelier 4 month old ,super exiting puppy, I think, he will be more calm after neuter.
    Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Most vets do it after the last set of shots, around 4 months

    [Reply]

  14. Hilda M Dawson says:

    I am having a terrible time with my 8 month old golden retriever biting my husband. she has had a trainer for the past three weeks and seems worse. I think she is bonding with him instead of us. If I put something in her mouth everytime she comes in, she seems to settle down and is peaceful for an hour or two. I’m a wreck any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  15. Sharman shambo says:

    Our havaneese seems to pick and choose when she wants to use the pee pee pad.
    She can run to it at times and other times she will scoot up stairs and pee? What should we do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/indoor-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  16. Heather says:

    The hand signal might work. I’ve noticed with our puppy that he watches for me to nod my head more than listens to what I say when he’s been told to stay. We make him stay when it’s time to eat until he’s allowed to get his food.

    [Reply]

  17. Kat says:

    We have a Chihuahua/Italian Greyhound mix rescue from San Antonio, and have had her 1 1/2 years. She absolutely hates and I mean hates my husband who is dog “neutral”. He does not have good balance so he uses a walker which may cause her to get stressed out, but after 1 1/2 years, I would have thought this would go away. She won’t come near enough for him to give her a treat, will bite at his ankles when he is on his feet heading for the door. Barking wildly, circling around the sofa. He has never mistreated her, but we don’t know her history. What would you recommend?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would look into a veterinary behaviorist who can help you all but will need to come to the home and see the dynamics of everyone in the home.

    [Reply]

  18. Bonnie says:

    I have a dog part terror and poodle, when we walk him he pulls bad. And I don’t know if it’s normal but he eats other dogs poop. We try to pull him away from it but he pulls to try to get it. We try to take him a different direction, but he goes right back there every time. We got him from a humane society, he’s 2 years old, and very nervous. He will also snap at people he doesn’t know and bark at them like he’s going to tare them up. Me and my husband will have to really hold on to him and pull him back so he won’t bite, and try to assure him that it’s ok. We’re so confused how to help him calm him down.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I recommend my companion dog course. Email Dana at info@thedogtrainingsecret.com to get enrolled.

    [Reply]

  19. Sandra Little says:

    I have a question……I’m trying to take your advice of considering my dog is an athlete and I try to get him to chase a ball and sometimes he will and sometimes he won’t If he wants to play he does but if he doesn’t he won’t no matter what I try. My dog is a minature poodle and he loves to run and run and run but only when he wants to. He’s a dog from a shelter and he’s 2 years old. I’ve had him for 3 months. How do I get him to exercise every day? I’ve never seen a dog behave this way at 2 years old.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teach-dog-play/

    [Reply]

  20. Alyce Burns says:

    My 5 month old Shetland Sheep dog likes to bark at bicycles and cars. She wants to run after them. How do I train her not to do this?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this and search this page for articles on attention and eye contact and focus. http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/cohabitating-herding-dog/

    [Reply]

  21. Pam Ryan says:

    I have a 3 1/2 minth old Boston who is very luvely and excitable. We are having a problem with his biting at hands snd barking aggressively when we tell him no.. Like a juevenile delinquent. Will neutering help and what orher methods to calm him down? Thank you

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would neuter for sure and I would get in on our aggression course. email dana at info@thedogtrainingsecret.com to get enrolled. Training is crucial

    [Reply]

  22. L.weaving says:

    My dog a rescue border collie is good on all commands at home .but when in the park with a ball ,he will return half way lie down with her back towards me when I call her she comes a bit closer ,lie down turns he back. ,j
    Have tried two balls . But puts the ball in my hand at home. What am I doing wrong

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Leave the park when he doesn’t bring it to you, or use a leash so that you can guide and teach him

    [Reply]

  23. Marie Hanerkam says:

    I’m 62 years old and never had a dog. How should I pick the correct dog for me?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    That depends on your exercise and living situation and what exactly you are looking for in a dog.

    From there, I would find a rescue for the type of dog you are looking for and find a nice 1 to 2 year old dog so you can skip the potty training stages and get a dog that specifically fits your needs which a rescue will be happy to find for you.

    [Reply]

  24. Anna says:

    I have a Slikie Yorkie he’s 6 years old. Very loveable everyone loves him. His problem is he cant stop licking you when you let him.Everyone complains.What can I do .PLEASE HELP

    [Reply]

  25. Clarence says:

    Even little dogs feel strong when on a leash, remember they have 4 wheel drive, er 4 paw drive!!!

    [Reply]

  26. Teresa Juliano says:

    Another great article!!!

    Teresa

    [Reply]

  27. G B Ross says:

    When I lived in the country, I took in many strays and give away dogs of varying ages and sizes. However, I rarely had a puppy. I bought my first in late November; she is a Moyen Poodle. Everything I had read did not prepare me for her temperament . . . barking, making noise all the time, even when she sleeps. I had wanted a GOOD companion dog for my husband who has dementia. I have house trained many dogs, but she does not remember from one day to the next what she has been taught. She will not come although I have used several sure fire methods that never failed with any of the dogs from the past. I have had blind dog, deaf dogs, and 2 that have had both problems. I have had terriers for years, but the poodle out does them in avoiding training.

    [Reply]

  28. Susie says:

    I have a 4.5 mo old Aussiepoo. She is kennel trained and I’ve taught her to ask to go outside with a bell. She is very good about it, however, I have kept the carpeted areas gated off until I felt I could expand her space. Every time she accidentally gets onto the carpet she will potty. Even sometimes when I have just brought her in. It is always what she does. We just got new carpet in our basement and she made it through the gate and went down and potties immediately. What am I doing wrong? She knows she is supposed to potty outside.

    [Reply]

  29. lynn says:

    Hi Nancy,

    Our dog was too. We immediately put him into training. Our trainer taught us the “Touch” Command…. This command has been a Godsend. Start out at home by wiggling your fingers and getting your dog to touch our hand with his nose. When he can do this turn it into a game by sitting in a dinning room chair so your dog can really roam around. Now get him to touch your hand repeatedly by moving it around. He can run around the chair or even under it as long as he touches your hand with only his nose. This will teach your dog that when you tell him to touch it will not hurt him. When he is comfortable with this it is time to put it in practice. Bring out objects that are not noisy. You get up close and personal with the object now tell your dog to touch the item too. At first he will be hesitant but soon he will become confident that when you say “Touch” the item will not hurt him. Now it is time to use it when he is skittish of something that will not hurt him….. For us it was the neighborhood kids on their skateboards. We got one of the kids to let him Touch the non moving skateboard and then we rolled it back and forth, then the boy got on his skate board and moved a few inches at a time. We let our dog walk along… now he fine when the kinds come by on their skate boards…. hope this works for you too!

    [Reply]

  30. Sylvia Walker says:

    I have a 2 year old Rottweiler bitch – she’s my sixth, over a period of 35 years. She loves to hunt and is a good tracker. Today in the forest she cleared off, doing her own thing, totally oblivious of me (and that was following 3 hours free running and jumping). She came back after half an hour. She did the same a couple of months ago (gone about 3 hours that time) so I carried liver/chicken treats and used the extending lead for a while. I thought she’d improved but obviously not. My question is, is there anything I can do, and am I approaching it the wrong way? They are often very independent dogs. I’d value your opinion. Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The problem is that she has learned the best things are found away from you.

    I want my dogs to think I am the best thing and in control of the best things. I don’t let them off leash until I know I am the focus of their world. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/rewarding-lesson-letting-dog-run-free/

    [Reply]

  31. charlotte watson says:

    How to keep my Shih Tzu from bolting out the door? Tried the foot on the leash hold. She goes investigating the neighborhood. I’m so afraid she will get hit by a car. Never has she been scolded for this (nor rewarded for coming back)
    Scared to death.

    [Reply]

  32. Doreen says:

    I have trained my now 8 month old lab to “LEAVE IT”. It only works in the house though. And he listens every time. As soon as I get him outside, it’s like I don’t exist. I’ve been working on this daily since he was 4 months old. He eats sticks and it makes me nervous. Any ideas on how I can get him to listen to the command “LEAVE IT” outside.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    you have to train for it

    [Reply]

  33. Doreen says:

    what does that mean. I have to train for it??

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    if you want your dog to listen in the car, you have to train in the car. If you want your dog to listen at the park, you have to train at the park… etc. you must train for what you desire. Work on leave it in the real world.

    [Reply]

  34. terry menger says:

    My amazing 6 month old German Shepherd, Max, barks at every thing and every sound. This has encouraged our Boxer to become a fulltime barker as well. Day or night, anytime and anywhere. How can I train them to stop this behaviour? Thanks in advance.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    search my articles, there is a search bar at the top of the page for barking and quiet

    [Reply]

  35. Bette Scully says:

    At what age can I leave my 10 month old maltiee poo alone over night? We have a doggie door so he can go in and out.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    depends on the dog’s understanding of the dog door. At 10 months he should be able to hold his bladder

    [Reply]

  36. Jeff says:

    We rescued an Australian kelpie/collie mix at about 4 months old. Blue is now a year old. She seems to be getting nervous around me lately. When she is in her bed and I start to get up from my chair she immediately gets up and starts to go to her crate. If I sit back down she returns to her bed. If she is in her bed and I enter the den where her bed is in she gets up and starts to circle my chair. I don’t holler at her or hit her. Is this something she might have experienced with her previous owner or am I possibly doing something to bring this on? She is not affectionate or comes to me on her own.

    [Reply]

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