My Number One Fear for Dogs During the Summer

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puppy training, golden retriever training

Thanks to “A Place to Love Dogs” for the cute picture

There are lots of risks that your dog may face every day.

Mosquitos carry Heartworm Disease.

Ticks carry Lyme Disease.

There are always the risks of other diseases, other dogs and cars but one thing always scares me most about my dog’s welfare during the summer.

The HEAT

Hot days kill dogs.

Most of us know enough not to leave our dogs in the car on a hot or sunny day, but did you know in some states it is illegal?  AZ, CA, IL, ME, MD, MN, NV, NH, NJ, NY, ND, SD, VT, and WV all have laws concerning leaving your animal unattended in your vehicle.   Although the penalty is usually not nearly enough in my opinion!

So we can admit we know not to leave our dogs in a hot car on a sunny day but did you also know that just being left outside without shade (or sometimes even with shade) or exercise on a hot day can kill your dog?

My husband and I are avid hikers and geocachers.   When we have a day off we are often found hiking through the mountains with our K9 friends at our side.

But as the temperature climbs we are sometimes unknowingly putting our dogs at risk.

puppy training, golden retriever training

Avoid High Temperatures and Direct Sunlight

When I was a vet tech and worked with my friend (the vet at the local vet clinic) she use to tell all of her clients that anytime the weather is over 70

degrees your dog is at risk for heat stroke.

Think about it 70 degrees is not hot at all; for us!

But your canine friend has fur and did you know he can’t sweat like us?  Dogs can only expel heat through their feet, and by panting.

If you exercise your dog above 70 degrees he should have constant access to water, not only that he can drink but also the kind he can submerge himself in to cool his body temperature.

As we were hiking the other day, the temperature climbed up over 80 and I watched as our dogs went from pond, to pond, to mud hole and then the river to cool their temperature.

What Can you Do?

Be knowledgeable about where you are taking your dog and make sure there is shade and water available.

If you haven’t hiked there before, go without your dog if it is hot.  Even hiking trails that are near water may not be very shady for hundreds of feet or even a mile or more.  Your dog can overheat during this time!

Bring cool water.  Either carry your dog’s water for him, or let him carry his own chilled water.   There are backpacks that distribute the frozen or chilled water over your dog’s body to help him stay cooler and an added benefit is that he can also drink some of the water when you stop.

Monitor your dog closely.  Heat stroke begins with heavy panting and difficulty breathing.  The tongue and mucus membranes appear bright red.  Saliva becomes thick and dogs can have bloody diarrhea.  The temperature can climb to 104 degrees very quickly and will become life threatening.

Carry a rectal thermometer.  I am sure some people think it is gross or would never want to take their dog’s temperature but having one with you and being familiar with how to use it can save your dog’s life!

puppy training

Recognize “Long, Fat Tongues” and other signs of Distress!

What Can You Do if You Suspect Heat Stroke?

Get your dog out of direct sunlight and heat.

Take your dog’s temperature with a rectal thermometer every 10 minutes until it is normal.   Normal body temperature for your dog is between 101 and 102.5 degrees.  Anything over 103 is abnormal and needs to be cooled.

If your dog’s temperature is over 104 you will need to help cool him by using cool water, the hose, a pond or body of cool water but not ice water!  Even a muddle of mud or muddy water may be cool, you can worry about bathing him later.

Once his temperature is under 103 stop your cooling efforts or he may go into shock and hypothermia.

Following an episode of heat stroke make sure to take your dog to the vet for a health check, even if you have gotten his temperature under control.  Heat stroke can cause spontaneous bleeding, irregular heartbeat, kidney failure and seizures.

My Rules

  • Go early in the morning or late evening if you take your dog so it will be cooler and there will be less direct sunlight.
  • Always take drinking water to avoid overheating and dehydration.
  • Make sure a body of cool water is available.
  • If it is over 80 to 85 degrees depending on your dog, leave your furry best friend home it is way too hot for him to be comfortable even in cool water!

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There are 63 Comments

  1. Wanda says:

    Thank you so much for this information. You have more than likely saved a few lives. I am reposting it so all my friends with furry friends can read it.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Thank you!

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  2. Bill Davidson says:

    Minette, thank you for the info. I live in an oceanside community and there is usually a cool breeze. But when it is sunny my black lab is always panting after just a few minutes of walking. I never realized that even on what I consider a comfortable day my dog is in possible danger.

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  3. Ravinder says:

    Summer is really a tough times for dogs. Your information are valuable.

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  4. Dave Briston says:

    Hey this has been a real eye opener for me too. It only gets hot a few times a year in the uk but I see a lot of dogs getting kept in cars in the summer and it’s not right. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. I have 2 car keys so I can leave car on with air-conditioner on and lock the car, (windows a bit open too), when my dog is along when I’m shopping.She also has her tip proof water dish, and I park in the shade no matter how far I have to walk to the door of the store.

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    Cindy Reply:

    What happens if your car shuts off for some reason? I would never trust my dogs welfare to the hopes that my car is going to keep running…someday it might not. Leave your dog at home when you shop.

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    Stephen J. Reply:

    I am amazed! Not only are you running the risk of the engine stopping, as Cindy pointed out, but you are also causing a considerable amount of pollution.

    You may also find that you are still contravening the law as the dog is left alone and unattended in the car.

    Do please do as Cindy suggests and leave you friend at home or some other suitable place when you visit the shops.

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    Debbi Reply:

    That is what happened in Arizona with a police dog. The car ( with AC on) was on but it failed. The police dog actually broke thru the back window as he was in major distress. Unfortunately he ended up dying. That was when they made it illegal to leave a dog in the car at any time.

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  6. Rae Crowe says:

    thank you soo much for this info…. very interesting and I have taken it on board for my 12 week old pup

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  7. Meredith says:

    I’ve Read that mastiffs are more susceptible to heat stroke then other breeds. This seems to be true since my mastiff very rarely pants. May I assume then that when she does pant that she is near/approaching dangerous temperature?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Ask your vet for more clues about your girl.

    Mastiffs are such large dogs that it is difficult for them to cool themselves! They need indoor shade and air conditioning!

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  8. Rick Moss says:

    This is great advice. I live in NE Florida and the heat/humidity can be brutal. My 4 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback and I just got back from a 2 mile hike where the temperature at 8:00 am is already 78 degrees. She really appreciates the water on these hikes and for the next 5 months I never leave home without it.

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  9. Kathy says:

    I live in Southeast Arizona. We are right by the border and at 5,000 feet. Last summer we took people and dogs in during the Monument fire, and were in standby as a pre-evac area. We are usually 15 degrees cooler than Pheonix and 10 degrees cooler than Tucson, we rarely go above 95, but we are in the 90’s for most of May through September. I myself don’t like the heat. I’m originally from a cold climate. I love it between 35 and 65 degrees. So I tend to get up at 4:30 am and walk my dogs. Durring the school year that is necessary because I teach a before school class at the high school at 6:30AM, and I am a substitute teacher after that. During the summer I stay on that schedule so that the temp. is between 65 and 72 when we walk. I’ve always felt that people we’re crazy to walk in the heat even at 9:00 AM. I always felt for the dogs, but I hadn’t realized that even 70 was a dangerouse temp for them. I do go hiking a lot, but usually it is between October and March. I’m very involved with the boy scouts in our area. I am a BSA councelor for the dog care merit badge, which my dogs help me with several times each year. Vets and others need to publish this type of info more. Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Libby Reply:

    Before sending my son’s 8 mos old GoldenDoodle to him when he moved to Chandler, Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix, I called a vet there to ask what do people do with their dogs in such a hot climate? The gal at the Vet’s office assured me that dogs are fine in Arizona, even heavily furred ones like our GoldenDoodle “adapt”. This was a Vet’s office! Now the dog is back with me, and I can see that in 80 degree temps he has a hard time walking more than a few blocks. There is no way this GoldenDoodle would be OK living in Arizona! What do the people there do? I know my college-age son would not get up every morning at the break of dawn to walk the dog. He even had been leaving the dog outside all day while he was at work! He thought the dog was OK because they had a pool for the dog and a thing that sprayed water if he pulled a handle. He did what he could for the dog, but I’m glad the dog is back in Indiana with me!
    I am definately changing my habit of walking the dog during the heat of the day, even though I hate getting up early! Thank you for this article!

    [Reply]

  10. Kyle says:

    Thank’s for the heads up this is a great advice for all dog owners.

    [Reply]

  11. Linda Harshman says:

    I need help with my sheltie, she barks all the time for no reason. I have tried a whistle, the blu sonic device, I have tried everything I can think of.I have had dogs bark before and was able to stop them, but I am loosing this battle. She is a 5 yr old female and my baby.. Any help or ideas would greatly be taken into advisment. Thanl You

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    gaby Reply:

    i used to have peeks lost both of them couple years ago from heat we get pretty hot here in summer have large yard with 19 trees surounding the proerty on day it was like 110 i brought them in the house long before that but that nght was a hot night i turned cooler off to conserve energy it was hot for me also but my little dogs had already had a hot day so continurd heat is also bad. not saying an air conditioner would have helpped. i have a labrottie service dog we are never out in the heat to say i choose not to take him to a lot of places for his protection. never in th car has he been left i even have a back seat fan just for him. at the park e have a fan also we both lay on the grass when it gets hot. he is a go getter and wants to go all the time so much energy i make him sit with me i made a back pack for him that carries our water i take four bottles each day two are frozeen to keep other two cool on each side i have yt needed to use all four bottles but better to be safw than sorry.

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  12. Val says:

    This information is awesome. We like to go hiking a lot, and plan on going camping a lot this summer. Does this effect our pit bull as much as other dogs since she has shorter hair?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It certainly can especially if she has a shorter snout.

    Find shade, go hiking in the morning or at night/evening and carry water!

    [Reply]

  13. Beth says:

    Such good advice…yes, they are so precious, and we as caretakers, need to do our very best. All STATES should make it illigal to keep dogs in cars.
    Spread the good word, to EVERYONE..

    [Reply]

  14. Louise Crocker says:

    About 8 years ago, I took my furry little Schnoodle for a walk around the block in our Midland, Texas home town, during mid-morning. I thought the 80-degree temperature was safe for him, until, halfway through the walk, he lay on the sidewalk, panting, refusing to budge. I carried him home, grateful for his enate intelligence that would not allow him to force
    himself.

    Today, I read your article and responses which lower the dog-safe temperature to 70 degrees or less. I am grateful to you for publishing that information and correcting my error which could be dangerous to my
    little dog.

    [Reply]

    Tammy Reply:

    Its amazing how much our dogs can communicate to us if we only have the knowledge and love to listen to them. I commend you for listening to what your dog had to say…it probably saved his life.

    [Reply]

  15. Cindy says:

    This is to Angela who carries two car keys so she can leave her dog in the car with the engine running and the air conditioning on while she is shopping. What happens if your car shuts off for some reason and you do not know it? In my opinion, better to leave your dog at home than to take chances like this. I, too, did not realize that 70 degrees can be too hot for a dog to exercise. I live in SW Florida and 70 degrees is cool for us, so thank you for this information.

    [Reply]

    Angela Christopherson Reply:

    I live in Western Wash. but it can get hot, thanks for the info, from now on my little baby stays home in the coolness of the house no matter how much she wants to come for a ride, I’d rather she was safe n cool.

    [Reply]

    Cindy Reply:

    I am so glad. You must love your dog very much to change your way of doing things for her after finding out new information. I need to watch mine more carefully (two chihuahuas) as they love to chase each other around the yard. I am bring them in more quickly now that I know about the 70 degrees limit.

    [Reply]

  16. JLeslie says:

    Thanks for this great advice. Where can I get one of those backpacks for a teacup size dog?

    [Reply]

  17. Nate Salsbury says:

    Lots of references to “carrying water for the pooch to drink”. What kind of vessel do you recommend – how to describe it in a pet store?

    [Reply]

  18. Kay says:

    I live accross the street from a woman who leaves her dog chained in the back yard all. Even in the winter! I have confronted her about this more than once. I have even gone over and unchained the do and turned the hose on. Why in hell do people get pets and don’t give them the kind of love and affection, that they give us so freely!!!! I wish I could chain her up for a week!

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  19. Susan King says:

    I have another cool (pun intended!) tip that helps. When it’s really hot when I’m sitting outside (in the shade with my dog), I have 3 of those rectangular gel packs that I take out of the freezer and put in a pillow case for him to lay on. At the end of the day I put them back in the freezer. He loves to lay on it. Of course he’s a small dog so I don’t know how you’d do it with a larger dog. He won’t get hypothermia from it as he’s only going to use it to his comfort level. Right now he’s on his side, beside it, with his belly against the edge and his legs laying over the gel packs. Of course there’s a cool bowl of water in the shade. I’m thinking of getting a small kid’s wading pool and putting an inch or two of water in it for him to lay in/walk in, but think I’ll borrow the neighbors to make sure he’d use it before I buy one.

    [Reply]

  20. Lilia poustovoytova says:

    dear Minette,i live in the tropical country,and i always worry about my agility dog during a summer competitions,i really like idea about backpacks,how can i found them,can u give more details about it,how to fix them on dog,etc…thanks!

    [Reply]

  21. Gayle says:

    Great info. I live in Tx so it easily will be at or above !00. I don’t take her shopping with me but I am planning to take her on a road trip in Sept and Oct. N.Mex,Az, Ut, and Wy. Looks like I may have trouble in Az.just going into the rest room or something. Definitely no restaurants. Hopefully the temp should be cool enough by then that walking at my campsites will be ok. Right? Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  22. claire says:

    thank you, info like this should be on the billboard (big and visible) of every park and parking lots. Finally may be the message will sink in.

    [Reply]

  23. Mike Craine says:

    Seems a bit over the top.I would suggest most homes are kept at 70F.If your dog has shade & water in your yard I just can’t believe it would be in danger of overheating at 70 degrees.Raise that to over 80F. & your dog might like a stroll through the sprinkler.Then again,so would the person he owns!

    [Reply]

    Angela Christopherson Reply:

    How about ice cubes in the water dish? I had a trainer say it’s a good way to help them stay cool. Gotta keep an eye out and put more in when they melt.

    [Reply]

  24. nelly Boets says:

    We live in a high temp. area. I have a two keys in my car, so I can put on the air- conditioner when I need to get in a store for a short time and will be able to lock the door.

    [Reply]

  25. Gary Martin says:

    I am a Wilderness Ranger in a National Forest and spend most of my days hiking in the Wilderness. This area is mostly granite and at higher elevations pretty much open country. Even at 7 to 8,000 feet temps can be in the 80’s. Altitude sickness is also something I look for in dogs on the trail. I am also concerned about the dogs paws on the granite surface which is not only abrasive, but also gets very hot. I have found bloody paw tracks on many of the trails. I suggest that for this rugged country your best friend will continue to be your best friend if left at home. Before a walk on a solid surface, sidewalk or asphalt, feel the ground. Would you walk barefoot on it?
    Hydration is also very important for you and your dog. I have shared my water with many a hiker and their furry friend.
    Most hikers carry a first aid kit for themselves. How about one for your dog too.
    I once found a black Lab tied in the back of an open pick-up at a trail head and the temp was 90+. Animal control was notified and the dog removed for safety. The owner received a hefty federal citation and I’m sure Animal Control had a bill or two also.
    As for leaving a dog in your car with the engine and AC on and a window open, the cars exhaust (carbon monoxide) can also be a killer.

    [Reply]

  26. Danielle says:

    Thank you for this. My dog gets seizures when it is very hot and the vet diagnosed her with epileptic fits and she is on calming tablets. They do seem to help but she has had another two strokes on very hot days at home and they do have enough shade.

    [Reply]

  27. Susan says:

    We have a Great Pyrenees who will overheat in the shade on a 70degree day here in Nevada. We bought
    her a hard plastic kiddie pool and she loves it. We don’t fill over a few inches as the local wildlife
    seem to enjoy the pool too!

    [Reply]

  28. Ann Horsfall says:

    Common sence really. Have you every walked down the street at mid-day on a blistering hot day, wihout your shoes and socks on? I bet you don’t walk far. Yet people take their dogs to the shops and markets, it must be agony for them through there paws. Concrete holds heat like a sponge. Feel it some time you may be surprised.

    [Reply]

  29. Sherylbe says:

    Thank you so much for info, it’s so needful. I’ve been a pet owner for about a month, and I want to be a loving one. I love my puppy (Lady). Thanks again for such valuable info.

    [Reply]

  30. kathleen says:

    have you seen any doggie ‘vests’ that I could put frozen gel packs in?

    [Reply]

  31. JC says:

    Great information! I have a question as a first time dog owner of a 10 month Vizsla. We live in AZ and as you know it is very hot. One day per week I take our girl to doggie daycare. She used to go more often but with the heat I am starting to worry. I know they have shaded areas, kiddie swimming pools and water is always available. I know when she is there she runs and plays like crazy. The dogs are indoors for “nap time” for two hours in the middle of the day. When I picked her up last week she was panting like crazy and was drooling. I got her home and cooled her down by rubbing water on her. Here is my question… Is it too much to let her be outside at daycare once per week? There are always workers in the yard with the dogs but on the other days of the week she is mostly inside in the cooled house. I live the idea of having our girl socialized and exercised but am worried that it’s just too much… Also, about her pads. If we are walking from the house to the car and the ground is hot, should I carry her? Is there something that I should be doing to her pads so that when she is outside (even to potty) she isn’t being burned? Honestly the back patio during an AZ summer burns my feet.
    Thanks for your help :)

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    That is a personal question with what you are comfortable with and is hard for me to answer.

    I use to live in GA and it got pretty hot there too! We use to do daycare play but also had pools, shade and water. It is about making sure you are comfortable with the staff and ensuring their knowledge and safety protocols.

    you can get booties for her feet for when she has to step on hot ground.

    [Reply]

  32. Linda Harshman says:

    I need help with my sheltie, She is my sweet ba y, except she barks all the time, at leaves moving, cars driving down the street, anything. I have fries the collar, the blue sonis device that you push when she barks, I have tries talking, speaking to her , yelling all which do absolutly no good at all I am just about ready to give up I love her to death and this is my second sheltie so I know the breed. My first one Laci loved everyone and everything. This one names Angel hates everyone and everything. Barks all the time like I said. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I have also tried treats when she doesn’t bark Help Linda

    [Reply]

  33. samantha says:

    I have two little chihuahua’s and they are not even warm if it isn’t at least 80 degrees. 70 and lower is cold for them. I know that it’s because they are chi’s though. I do take my babies every where with me but they never get left in the car. They are both so little they fit in a fully closed dog purse together with plenty of room to spare. They are only about 3 lb’s each and most people don’t even know there are dogs in there because they never bark or growl and they love people. Especially my female. I feel bad for people who can’t take their doggies with them everywhere they go but that’s why I have little dogs so that I can take them with me. I love my love lil chi’s

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  34. Madalyn says:

    Hmmmm…..70 degrees? I keep my home thermostat set on 78 degrees. My dogs shiver if the air is on 75 or lower…. (They are small). I usually walk them at 8 or 9pm, and on some summer nights it is about 75 at that time. They are fine. We walk about a mile to mile and a half, in our hilly neighborhood. They drink some water when we get back to the house. No panting, and no stress. I think 70 is not really a good guide line for ALL dogs. Maybe most of them, but not tiny dogs. Like I said, mine would be very cold at that temperature…. Just saying… Great article though. too many people do things to put their dogs in danger in the heat. Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is for exercising during the day in the sunshine! Most dogs can overheat (even the small ones) at 70 in direct sun when they are exercising.

    [Reply]

  35. Houyeme Melkia says:

    Thank you !!! it’s good to know that as i live in the south of france and it’s very hot during this period !! :(

    [Reply]

  36. MTS says:

    I think that what you are trying to say , is that people should just pay more attention to their dogs. Dogs are like people in the way that it depends on a lot of factors, breed,health,weight,activity level,etc ,etc,etc. Just beware and pay attention to signs that your dogs are showing.

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  37. Brooke says:

    We have a 6 month German Shepherd who needs to be exercised. My only option is to take him for a run at 6am. Why? Because that is the coolest time of day. It is still over 90 degrees at that time, and soon it will be closer to 100. Phoenix is not the place for dogs during the summer, but I’m not sure how else I can get my dog the exercise he needs. Any ideas?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    At 6 months he is too young to go running…real running that is. Running (the structured kind) can affect his growth and cause arthritis later in life!

    Instead take him for a walk or play ball or training games! Or take him swimming! http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/indoor-doggy-games/

    [Reply]

  38. Mel says:

    I live in Jacksonville, FL, where the temps hit 80 most days between March and September, and my dogs — 2 shelties — have to run every day for a while or they go nuts. I take them to a dog park in town that has a “lake” (it’s a small man-made pond) and they run and yap for a while, then go into the water up to their front elbows (they won’t go deeper) and relax, sometimes lapping the water too. We try to go early in the morning because in the summer the temp gets to 80 by 9 a.m.

    [Reply]

  39. Anne says:

    We live in Cairns in Tropical North Queensland, Australia. Our summer temperature very rarely gets below 70 degrees farenheit and we have a golden retriever. In summer our sunrise is about 5.00am – temperature about 22 celcius (71 farenheit) and we are normally on the road by 5.30am every morning for our walk. Being tropical climate we have direct sunlight from sunrise and we do about a 3.5 kilometre walk (about 2.3 miles) every morning and that is really about all he copes with. My husband then walks him again every afternoon for maybe 1 and 1/2 miles – temperature more than in the morning. We play fetch in the back yard around dusk and we also play fetch up the hallway inside of an evening in the airconditioned house.
    As I write this, it is currently 9.15pm and the temperature at the moment is 29 degrees celcius (about 84 farenheit). The temperature might get below 70 farenheit sometime around midnight to 2.00am and that is of course not the time to be walking the dog. There is no way I could run him with a bike during spring / summer – average temperate between 68 to 88 farenheit and our autumn winter months are really not much cooler – average temperatures 60 to 78 – keeping in mind that even by sunrise in Winter the temperature is up around 68 degrees.
    So my question is, how do I give him enough “daily” exercise (other than our morning and afternoon walks and daily “fetch” games) to keep him physically fit and mentally occupied in this sort of heat?? And please don’t suggest swimming as we don’t have a pool and the closest “water hole” that we could take him is over 20 miles away and really not feasible before or after work.

    Any exercise suggestions will be appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is of course safer to exercise them when it is dark. Just carry water and make sure to hydrate.

    Do training and teach him new things inside in the air conditioning.

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/indoor-doggy-games/

    You can also consider doggy day care which is often held inside in air conditioning

    [Reply]

  40. david says:

    Interesting issues… and good point of view. I am living on a desert island full of volcano rocks ‘ surfaces and, even if it is not too warm because overwindy, rock surfaces can be very steamy and sharp…Is it a good idea let the dog wear leather shoes to avoid her feet be damaged ?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I certainly would!!!

    If it is not comfortable for your feet it probably isn’t for hers!

    [Reply]

  41. cindy says:

    Hello-

    I have an 88 lb. male Borador. I live in Phoenix, AZ and at the moment outside temp are hovering around 105 degrees.

    Last summer I noticed my ‘then’ 2 year old pup panting hard… way above the cited 30 breaths/minute at rest. It seemed to wane during the cooler winter months and returned again this summer.

    Last summer blood tests were perfectly normal. I have tried to adjust many aspects of his diet (most raw food) with supplements to detox. His nose drips at times and have him on a no grain diet but do give him antihistamine which at seem to help his breathing. But I am wondering if this is just a basic heat in the summer problem.

    In order to conserve on my electric bill during the warmer months I try to keep the thermostat around 80 degrees. In fact, I often have to start using the A/C because my dog starts panting so hard and keeps me awake (he sleeps on my bed)

    Anyway it seems if I keep the temp around 75 degrees… he rests better. Could his excessive panting be merely that 80 degrees inside my home is just too warm for him? He is conditioned to always have a fan on him. Thanks, Cj from AZ

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Your vet is a better one to ask this question!

    [Reply]

  42. Linda says:

    I live in Florida and walk at least 5 miles a day with my Australian Shepherd. In the summer temps can be 75 degrees plus at 6:30 a.m. I carry a spray bottle with water and throughout our walk spray her down. Does that help to keep her cool or is there something better that I can try? I have never seen signs that she is in distress. I have tried carrying cold drinking water for her, but she doesn’t want to drink it. Will drink when we are finished with our walk and back in the car.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would use ice water for the spray and read this; I think you will find it helpful http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/hot-weather-doggy-hacks/

    [Reply]

  43. Cheryl says:

    We have a 4 year old Great Pyr and just moved to Florida. I saw a mention of a backpack that carries water and it also sounded like the water may cool the dog down. Does anyone have more info on something like this and where I could buy one. thanks

    [Reply]

  44. Peter Traube says:

    This is very good info. My Aussie when it’s over 82• will go with, but would much prefer the cold cement in garage. She will be in house AC, or cold garage floor? Is this ok, also not a lot of get up & go., makes me happy I know each bed for dogs and I will never give her a puppy cut because an Aussie down to low do you need that air to breeze and release the heat I just want know if it’s normal for overweight Aussie to be that lethargic when it’s that hot in the 90s

    [Reply]

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