How To Train Your Dog What’s “Off Limits” So He Stays Out Of Trouble

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puppy training, begging dog video

 

NOTE: If you have not yet downloaded the free report, Off Limits Training that I reference in the video, please click on the image of the report to download it now.

 

The training video with the Rhodesian Ridgeback puppy above was designed for you to watch AFTER reading my special report.  So if you have not yet read through it, please do so now, because the course mentioned in this video has been released.

>>Click Here To Learn How To Train The Next Step<<

If you have already read the report that set the stage for this video, please tell me…

Did you find this video helpful?

If so, please leave me a comment, or post any questions you have about this technique below.  I’d love to hear from you.

And if you feel this video would be something  your dog owning friends and family might enjoy…

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Then go and USE this technique on your dog and report back!  I’m excited to see how this can start to change how compliant your dog is in your life.

Stay tuned for another great video in a few days!

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There are 592 Comments

  1. Diane says:

    Amazing, my puppy barks and While I getting his food ready and then hardly eats anything. I am excited to give this a try. Thank you for sharing and excellent video, not only the training but how you explain and speak yourself. Excellent job done.

    I can’t wait to see the new one and he thinks everyone should love him when we go out for a walk. Well he likes to jump up and one day it was wet from raining and I didn’t want him to get the mans pants dirty. So excited about your video’s.

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  2. Diane says:

    Excellent video, not only how to teach the dog, but also your work in the video.

    I can’t wait to give this a try and look forward to you videos. Thank you so much for sharing.

    I just tried to post and said broken link.

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  3. Diane says:

    I love how fast your puppy learns.

    I have tired the one where you put the hand under you hand until the puppy settles down. I can get my puppy to do it, but, when it comes to me getting his food out he barks, and carries on, until I have it in his dish ready. If I try to do fix his dish with food at it, if I don’t have it up he will be right in it.
    I tried the one with laying down and having your dog listen. He did well except the first one.

    I have taught him to take his treat after going on the pad, or outside to his play pen to eat it. However, he still hasn’t figured out, as he will go on carpet floor, and not even think of the pad.

    My dog begs and fusses about eating what we are eating. I make sure he eats his before he gets a little bit of ours, but I finally had to tell him to stop barking loudly, and spraying him with water to get him to stop barking. I really don’t know how to get him to stay in his play pen until we are done eating. He has eaten the zipper up and can’t close it. ETC>

    I like the many ideas you share. Thank you.

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  4. Craig Woody says:

    Looks like something that I can use and will try it out and let you know.

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  5. Margie says:

    I enjoyed watching your video, I have taught my dog to sit and wait until I say OK and then he will eat. He always looks at me before he starts to eat. We would like to teach our dog perimeter training. Can you help us with that?

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  6. Barbara Kelly says:

    Hi Chet, I really enjoyed your video – I have a 2-1/2 yr. old Miniature Poodle, she is quite intelligent so I am sure she will be able to do this if I am patient with her. Thanks for all the little tips you give but I haven’t yet used my first Dog Training Course as I have a sick husband to look after. Want to start soon!

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  7. Pat Key says:

    I am trying to keep up with all your great videos to train my 11 month old Yorkie. Using your techniques, in 3 days she learned to sit so well that every time we say it, her little bottom hits the floor. We now spell the word, sit, around her unless we want her to do just that. I have progressed to opening the front door and stepping way out with out her coming out. My only issue was the clicker. It scared her and she would run away and be afraid to come back.

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  8. Barbara says:

    I work with brussels griffons and a few rescue mutts (try to train then place them) The biggest problem I have is with a 4 yo stud. He not only marks territory but PEOPLE! Very embarassing and lead s the other dogs to take up marking too. Hope this will help. I’d rather train than mop.

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  9. Alessandro says:

    Hi,
    Unfortunately I could not watch the video, and I will not be able to watch it for several days, because it does required Flash.
    Today millions of people, around the world, are using iPad or iPhone to surfing on the net so…why are you still using Flash for your videos and loosing millions of viewers?
    Anyway!!! I bought your training section and few others different books, just to make sure I was training my dog in the right way.
    My labrador is very good dog and he behaves very well.
    I do have a problem though! A problem that I do not know how to fix.
    When he is getting exited, he does a bit of pee, no matter where we are.
    When he needs to release himself he goes where he is been tolled to go, but when he is happy the pee just come out itself (not much but enough)
    How could I fix that?
    Is there anything I can do?
    Regards
    Alex

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  10. Ssan Bizak says:

    How to teach your dog not to beg was great. I used it with my 8 week old puppy to leave it with pebbles and sticks. I’m working at making him wait before rushing to get his food. I still need lots of practice at this!

    Thank you!

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  11. June Manley says:

    I have an 8 month old Peekapoo. he is very tiny. I have had success in his potty training, and also sit, stay & come. He will not let me catch him unless I have food. also he chews my carpet. he noses it down into a little circle until he gets a strand loose. and then pulls it out. he will stop if I catch him, but I cannot keep my eye on him all of the time. I do however, have some success following your videos.

    Thank you
    June

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    Minette Reply:

    keep him on a leash or keep him with you, you CAN keep an eye on him all the time and if you can’t use a crate!

    Read this for teaching him to come http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/top-5-12-reasons-dog-called/

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  12. Justin says:

    This worked within the first few minutes of training with my American Staffordshire terrier mix with Dalmatian. We rescued her from the local shelter and she loves to play run around witch is fine with me. For the most part she is learning simple commands with or with out a treat. One thing that has become an issue is her barking, at me or my girlfriend. She will bark at us as if she wants to play and with I approach her she plays a “catch me if you can” game until she stops and rolls over to be pet. Don’t get me wrong I love a dog who can play but this game that she plays in the house is becoming a problem and would like to know how to teach her when she needs to calm down, and stop.

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    Minette Reply:

    Put her on a leash and when she barks put her on a time outside, like in another room or outside.

    But realize she needs exercise, her doing this is her way of trying to play with you… find a way to also give her what she needs.

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  13. Gary Jackson says:

    I purchased a couple of video (DVD) programs from you and liked them. How do I get this “house manners for dogs”? series???

    Gary Jackson

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    Minette Reply:

    email Dana at customer service info@thedogtrainingsecret and she can get you set up.

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  14. Ruth says:

    Excellent training guidance! It WORKS! I have five dogs and have them all leaving each other’s treats alone now!

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  15. Kim Reilly says:

    I can’t wait to try this with my adopted Aussie! He steals everything that hits the floor, regardless if it is food related or not. This can be pretty dangerous for him….he’s stolen scissors, knives,garlic, onions, cell phones, even my Kindle!!! He takes ANYTHING that is within his reach. I was not even able to decorate this past Christmas because he would steal and destroy anything that was within reach of his mouth, which made my home pretty depressing during this holiday season!

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  16. Carol Davis says:

    I’ve trained dogs for years and I’ve run into a problem I or other trainers know how to solve. This is a 6 y.o. GSD mix who was rescued from a hoarding situation. He was the only animal outside. There were 32 indoor cats and small dogs. He spent 6 years tied to a tree as sort of a guard dog. OK, he’s afraid toys, chew bones, won’t chase balls or thrown sticks – relatively minor issues. The problem that none of us can figure out how to solve is total feat of a ceiling fan – lights on or off. He even checks the ceiling before he comes into the house. Since his full history isn’t known, it’s difficult to know what direction to take. Any suggestions?

    BTW, that puppy was a Rhodesian Ridgeback. A word of caution – that breed likes to eat soft things like stuffed children’s toys, washcloths. etc. My daughter had one they finally had to put down after her third surgery. She had small children so it was hard to keep track of all the soft things.

    I really would like some suggestions about the ceiling fan, though. If he’s already in the house and I turn it on, he runs and hides in his crate and periodically checks to see if the fan is still on.

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  17. Darlene Bourne says:

    This technique worked really well with my dog and she picked up what she needed to do really fast. I am very interested to find out on more situations where we can have her make good decisions.

    Thanks very much
    Darlene

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  18. Louise says:

    The Off Limits course looks very promising. My dog Lilly has developed some very annoying habits. I think I’ve fallen into the “She’s so cute. How can I get mad at her?” syndrome. This course has the potential to train her and me about limits. Limits including on the worse thing I’ve seen her do (eat goose poop), her most annoying habit (it’s a toss-up between jumping up and licking). I think this course will make life easier for all of us.

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  19. Krystal Mcnemar says:

    I have a 3 year old Treeing Feist or Mountain Feist ( which simply translates to ADHD on steroids) lol. We love her and she has been to heck and back. I fostered her for a few months 2 years ago until she was adopted out. Only to be returned after two weeks. Little did I know, even after all of the careful questioning in the adoption app, and two visits that I had adopted her out to full blown physical abuse. Thank God she was returned, she came back fearful and would lay flat on the floor and pee if you said her name in any tone other than almost a whisper. It took 7 months to get her to trust that we would not hit or abuse her. The couple are now on a Do not Adopt list. I purchased the Off Hands 2.0 and I love it. I have not worked through all of it yet; but she has made great stride. Do I need this program as well? She is an attention hog, jumps all over everyone including me, and can drive us bonkers sometimes. The worst thing she has ever done was bolt out the door and ended being severely attacked by a dog that is forever being left outside right in front of my eyes. It was horrifying,

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    We have a lot of good courses. My recommendation is to finish that course, work hard. Train at least 3 x a day on basic things and then reevaluate.

    My favorite course of ours is our companion dog course. It is more advanced. If you are interested, it should start fairly soon (we run it twice a year) and you can contact dana at customer service at info@thedogtrainingsecret.com to find out when exactly it will begin.

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  20. Julie says:

    Hi Chet, i was getting your emails before, but i really didn’t try the training. I’m going to try this time i have to dogs 2, one is banjo and she is part chow with a little bit of shepard i can remember what her mother is,and Pugslee is a pugzu mother is a prebread pug and his father is a shiszu how every you spell it. When i got pugs at 7 weeks as soon as i put him down banjo took over mothering him. Pugslee and banjo always play pugslee would end up sitting on banjo’s nose. He has been a joy for me and banjo. One day i think pugs was about 3 months old and he got out the door it was in the winter time and he hadn’t been out much, anyway i have a bad back and can move fast i say banjo go get pugs he was heading for the road well banjo ran out grab pugs by the back leg and turned him around and he followed banjo back to the house.

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  21. Brent Fox says:

    It was really amazing. Our dog doesn’t use a bed even though we have one for him. Last night we watched the video. Prepped the treats. Brought his bed into the Kitchen. It less than 10 minutes we had him sitting on his bed and waiting for the ‘take it’ command. He is only 3 1/2 months old. We were all surprised. This morning right after his walk he came in the house and went right to his bed and sat down and was waiting for his treat. That was very unexpected but very cool. I have gotten excited about doing training seeing these kinds of results. WOW! Thanks Chet

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  22. Stephanie Roderick says:

    I love the hands off training program and am working on it with my 3mo old schnauzer. She is full of energy,but is making progress. She will sit,stay(30 sec) , come when called, has stopped nipping, most of the time. But we still have a problem with her jumping up, rushing her food, and terrorizing my 17 yr old cat. She steals his bed, his catnip toys, tries to eat his food, and barks at him. I really need to teach her some manners. I read the free report, but when I clicked on the demo video it would not open.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    we are having to use another server and the videos have to be reuploaded , my apology

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  23. Stephanie Roderick says:

    Please let me know when I will be able to open the begging video, also the no barking one won’t open either

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  24. Natalie Cream says:

    Wow, I just tried this with my 4 month old cavoodle and she learnt “take it” really quickly. Awesome……

    Too bad you haven’t made the videos to be able to be seen on an iPad. It would make my life so much easier.

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  25. Darla says:

    I am enjoying reading your articles and watching your training videos. I have had dogs all my life, various breeds, including a dingo, mostly mixes of some kind. Currently, my shepard mix is elderly and I don’t know how much longer I have with him. My kids that are still at home are middle school and high school aged. They talked their dad into getting me an American Bulldog. She is more of a challenge for training than my other dogs. She does fairly well responding to me. She is lazy. So walking is a little bit of a challenge. As she will stop and not want to continue. So I have been working on some of your techniques to get her walk with me. She is a follower. I will use this tech for getting her to come all the time. I am going to purchase your training videos.

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  26. Retha White says:

    Yes, I found it helpful. My puppies are now 10 and 14 weeks old and I hope they are old enough to learn the commands. It doesn’t work when I have the two of them together.
    Retha

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Puppies need to be separated, often, to learn

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  27. Lori says:

    This video was a revelation for me! I have for years taught my dogs to sit and wait for my “OK” before eating anything, including food, that was put, or fell, down. Mostly for safety reasons. Your video helped me understand the concepts behind it and how to do it much more effectively. I have the Hands Off 2.0, use it a lot! Thanks!

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  28. Sue says:

    Can’t open /play video

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  29. Betty Stoudt says:

    I saw your video and just tried it on my 8-year-old Yorkie and it worked beautifully. Thanks

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  30. jean emerton says:

    i am trying my best to train my 6months maltese x who is so full of life and in to everything. jean emerton.

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  31. Gaye says:

    Thank you so much for offering this video… my 13 month old Terrier mix ‘took’ to the training quickly. Can’t wait for the next video and for Feb 22! Seems the biggest problem we have is my lack of consistency… poco a poco for both of us!!

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  32. Trish says:

    Hey Chet, you may be a bird guy, but your dog training REALLY works. Thanks a lot. I have a 12 week old Golden Retriever/ Lab and he has accomplished every single thing I have taught him so far through your training. Training my dogs in the past has always been a chore because I got little results from a lot of work. Your methods have made training fun for both me and Riley Cooper. I always look forward to our next training session. Rileys worst thing that he does is steals family items (shoes, head phones, etc), and thinks its great fun to play keep away. His most annoying habit has been barking while I prepare his food. I know that these behaviors will be fixed with just the right training and some practice. Thanks! oh….have to tell you I laughed and laughed the first day I tried teaching him to ring the bells to go out. Before I even started a lesson, Riley ran over, grabbed the string of bells, ripped them off the wall and ran through the house and out an open door dragging the bells with him across the back yard. He thought this was the most fun thing ever!

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  33. Margaret Kohlhase says:

    Read the book but the video will not play. Just ordered the series on training your dogs to think but am having trouble getting the order to go through. Please let me know why these things are happening. Have two giant Schnauzers, who are a big handful, and want to get them to listen and not bark when they get excited, as the neighbor has threatened either to shoot them or put poison out, even though we live in the country on 26 acres, the dogs need to learn. Thanks for your help.

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  34. Red Barn Saint Bernards says:

    AWESOME!! Love the video, and tips…and of course the smart lil puppy. Now if only I could be you, because we know dogs are only as good as their owner/trainer. Maybe this old dog(me) can learn new tricks just yet. : ) We actually have pretty good dogs….but what Saint Bernards are not? I love when my 2 year old gets the full grown dogs in a sit or down, so adorable! Now I can not wait to show kiddos your videos (for better sit,stay,come, etc more tricks etc.) and put them to the test. : ) I would love to have all your materials and know them like the back of my hand. So I could offer to our new Saint puppy owners!…..for now I will give them link to your website!! I am so glad to have such an awesome option to show them. Now when are you making training video for training kids : )

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  35. Joan says:

    I love chugs my pug is 8and so lovely she is a lazy get and can sleep 15hrs straight

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  36. Joan says:

    I love my molly my pug she has always been great I couldn’t live without her she’s 8 yrs

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  37. Jackie Fountaine says:

    I have taught puppies/dogs I foster to sit for their meals. I hold the food while they look at me. I don’t move/talk. Eventually they sit trying to determine what I want. As soon as 1 sits, the first day, they all get fed. Then a day later 2 sit and they get the food. Finally, when I have 3 pups, they get fed when all 3 sit, and this takes a while, but they get it within 5 days or less. And I may or may not say SIT. If I do say sit, I later say SIT without food present, and they have learned it, and they sit. I did this w/ pups under 8 weeks, as they were weaned off Mom’s milk.

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  38. Jackie Johnson says:

    Just finish watching the video. Really makes sense and I believe I will be able to put this into play with success. I as others have more than one dog. It seems when I have one around what the dog has learned goes well. But when all three around it seems just to be a contest to see who can have may attention and all training seems to go out the window. Any suggestions?

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  39. Sharanx.x says:

    Maybe u should try getting him checked by a veterinarian he may have a bladder problem or something

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  40. Susan says:

    My dog and I have really bonded with all your help. Trainging me is alot harder but you seem to make it easy and achievable unlike other training courses, books and classes. Thankyou.

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  41. John Groat says:

    Training is fun, and oh for more hours in the day.
    My problem is: two dogs with different temperaments who I need to train separately. They are fine alone, but forget much of the learning when they get back together. Am I disheartened? Not at all!

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  42. John Alonge says:

    I will be picking up 2 Labrador puppies in a month so have purchased the Hands of Dog Training 2.0 course so I can complete the course the first time before we get the dogs and start training. I was wondering why in this ‘Off limits’ training video did not include the use of the ‘clicker’?

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  43. Diane says:

    My boxer pitt x is a well trained dog except on walks when he freezes and loves the Wiemeraner unless the small children are out. The the 2 dogs barke at each other. Wiemeraner is protecting “his” kids.
    When walking George and he freezes, I should just stand with him until he decides to walk again?

    [Reply]

  44. Bette says:

    Can’t wait to try this. Our pup is a year old and doesn’t mind too well. This should work well with him. Will let you know as we start the training.

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  45. Jake says:

    My dog happens to already be trained in this particular aspect of behavior, but there are other techniques you demostrated that I think will help me with other training exercises.

    [Reply]

  46. Jackie Fountaine says:

    I have trained many foster puppies/dogs, usually in 3 days, by simply standing and holding their food bowl, saying nothing. They may jump round, or stand looking at me, and when they get tired of waiting and sit, they immediately get the food bowl put in front of them. After 3 days at most, when they see me coming with the food bowl they sit and wait and get the food put down right away.
    It always works.

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  47. Judith Sharpe says:

    I have a 6 year old golden doodle,Leo. I had two of them until a month a go when Indie had to be put down. Indie was EXTREMELY smart. Indie was trained in one day. He opened doors by hitting the handle. He used to use pawing to signal he needed attention, I easily taught him to use his nose and poke me when he needed help..
    And so much more. NOW Leo is a different story. He is definitely not smart and he is VOCAL. He tries to tell you what he wants, loudly at times. I have taught him to get a toy when he is excited and that muffled his bark. He is just so excitable. I think you training videos would be very helpful. My concern is I have a Amazon Fire. Will I be able to open your videos?

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  48. We inherited a 1+year old German Sheppard who is very excitable. to the point of jumping on people when he is brought into the house. I realize he is still a puppy–kind of.. We are training him basic commands but he still has a mind of his own.

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  49. My dog’s name is Einstien (spelled wrong on purpose), he is four almost five. Einstien is 3/4 Springer spaniel and 1/4 cocker spaniel, he’s also VERY stubborn. I”m having a problem with him meeting anyone new, person or animal. I have to muzzle him the first 10-15 mins to make sure he won’t bite, and he REALLY wants to bite people who are afraid of doghs. It’s like he can tell they are afraid of him and he becomes more aggressive. I have never taught him to be mean and I was there for his birth, so I’m pretty certain no one else did either. How can I get him to stop trying to bite people? I am going to say “Biting people” is his wort habit and I really need something that works or he’s going to get us both in trouble and possibly himself “put down”.. :(

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would put him on leash and give him something to do obedience wise. Ask him to lay down etc. And, I would continue to use the muzzle, it is the thing that is keeping everyone safe.

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  50. Mark Nading says:

    Our family has had ranches and farms back to the American revolution and our on sight dogs were unique to urban trained dogs likened to the Hank The Cow Dog kids series, so I was intrigued by the Hollywood dog in the 50’s movie Hondo. Thanks for connecting the dots to the 21st century Mark Nading

    [Reply]

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