Teach Your Dog to Come When Called, No Matter What!

  • Pin It

  • Pin It

teach your dog to come every time, puppy training, pitbull training

Sometimes I think I am a Golden Retriever, everything is exciting to me, everything is fun, everything should be a game and everything is important, but I guess I am blonde.

I giggle when I look back at my dog training videos and my articles because to me EVERYTHING is critical!  Teaching your dog to come, to leave it, crate training, leash training everything is vital to you and your dog.  And, to be honest, it really is.  All dog training and the victory over behavior problems ensures that you keep your dog and that you both remain happy.

But, Teaching Your Dog To Come Is The Most Important
Dog Obedience Command Every Dog Should Know

Does Your Dog Come When Called?

So what happens if your dog is off leash, he sees a bunny or a deer and goes chasing after it?  Will he leave that distraction and come to you when you call him?  What if there is a car coming?

Recently a good friend lost his world champion obedience dog because he was chasing deer and was blindsided by a car.  I am still devastated for them both.  It can certainly happen to anyone who’s dog is off leash, and I can only hope and train hard and pray it never happens to me or my dogs.

How To Teach Your Dog To Come When You Call

puppy training

Are you FUN to Come to?

You HAVE to train, train, train for a good recall!  This is not something to let slack or ignore, this is THE MOST IMPORTANT thing you will ever do!  Your dog’s life may sometime depend on this exact command!

NEVER, ever call your dog when he is in trouble, your mad or if you are going to do something bad to him!  His name and the word “come” should never mean something bad.  So if he is in trouble go and get him.  If you are going to crate him or trim his nails, go to him, but do not call him.

You never want your dog’s name or come to = something bad or even slightly negative.  Imagine your dog and the bunnies…if “COME” means sometimes he goes in his crate, then there is NO WAY he is leaving those bunnies to come to you!

Would you come to YOU if you were mad or sounded that angry?

When You Call Your Dog It Should Mean FUN, FOOD, and PARTIES!

Does your dog drop everything and run to you when he hears the cookie jar rattle?  When you whisper “cookie” would he wake up from a dead sleep to rush to your side?  Why is it that he listens so well to the rattle of the treat bag or a word that means treat?

Because with 100% reliability you are going to give him a treat!  How often do you get into the dog biscuits but then don’t give him one?  Or ask him if he wants a cookie only to give him nothing?  Chances are you don’t.  Chances are you reward him and so he is familiar with the reward that is tied to the sound or the word.  If these things were not paired with something good or a treat, he would stop coming and they would stop being meaningful cues.

You must make sure that your command to “come” = something meaningful and good almost 100%  of the time!

Pair the word come with treats, with games and with jackpots of chicken breast and other wonderful things.  Don’t call your dog and then take for granted the fact that he actually came to you.  And, just know that your praise is never going to be as exciting or as motivating as a scuttling or taunting squirrel. However the knowledge that FOR SURE you are going to be rewarded and you might get some chicken breast is often worth the gamble for your dog!

puppy training

Look at it from his perspective and stop comparing him to “Lassie”.  Dogs want to fulfill their own needs, what is important is to pair what he likes with what you want!

My favorite way to teach my dog to come is to play hide and seek at home.  Games are FUN!  I don’t care if you are 80 or 20 or if you do or don’t have kids at home.  You need to PLAY with your dog in order to teach him you are fun!  Just like you play with your children or grandchildren; sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone because it is important for the dog or the child!

Have someone (your spouse, friend or your child) hold your dog’s collar as you tease him with some treats and dash away to hide.  First hide in easy to find places and as he gets better you can truly “hide” and make him find you behind doors, in his crate or other silly places.  As you call him praise him, this is critical even though you can’t see him coming you must assume that he is scampering after you so continue your praise.

“Fury COME, good girl, good girl, Come, good girl” until she gets to me.

“Fury COME!”  just isn’t motivating or exciting and she is likely to get bored and stop coming.  I have to motivate her to me and make it FUN!  The teasing and dashing is also important.  Just showing your dog a treat and sauntering off, is boring.

Which would you prefer?  Now which would you prefer if you were 5?  Remember your dog has the mentality of a child and needs fun and games!

Once he is finding you with exhilarating excitement in your home, all over your home, in funny places (yes I think dogs have a sense of humor), it is time to move this game outside.

Get a long line of 25 or 50 feet and play the same game; dashing behind trees and bushes.  Hide up inside trees or underneath things like your car; make this game the most fun thing your dog has ever done!    This imprinting of FUN, FUN, FUN along with reliable treats means your dog will be more likely to automatically leave the bunny, squirrel or deer to rush to your side when you call him!

It isn’t enough to teach this or play this once or twice, you MUST continue to play this game throughout your dog’s life.  Once it is imprinted and he is enjoying it, you can play it less but play it occasionally to keep it sharp and reliable.  If you notice him not coming to you when called go back to making it FUN and playing!

What Not To Do?

puppy training

Don’t Call Him if He won’t Come!

Don’t call your dog when he is in trouble or you’re going to do something negative to him.  I know I said it before but it begs to be repeated!  This will RUIN this command’s reliability!

Don’t be boring!  If you are boring your dog is less likely to listen!!  Dogs often mirror our behavior so the more excited and animated you are the more likely your dog will be to listen and enjoy himself.  Even if it is out of your comfort zone, get animated and have fun!

NEVER, EVER call your dog if you think he won’t come and you have no physical control of him (unless it is an emergency).

If your dog ignores you don’t give him the opportunity to ignore your commands!  This goes for any command but especially the COME command.  If your dog ignores you and doesn’t come, this means the command means NOTHING to your dog and nothing happens to him to make him come.

The more often you call him and he ignores you, the more the command loses its meaning and the less likely he is to ever come.  This is one of the 5 training pitfalls for training your dog to come that you need to avoid.

Instead, put him on a leash and work on the command by playing games OR at least put him on a leash so that if he ignores you, you can then make him listen by reeling him in!

You may have to slowly work on the command so that he listens off leash in a safe area like your yard, or a fenced in area.  When he doesn’t listen go to him, clip on the leash and encourage him to listen to you by restricting his ability to run away and by encouraging him with treats, toys and fun.

It is much easier to teach him this is fun, than to rely on force!

As always have as much fun as possible, this is what bonds you to your dog and your dog to you!  But work hard so that, if that moment comes and your dog’s life hangs in the balance he has a desire to play and to please you and leave any distraction behind!

 

Save

Save

Save

Want Your Dog To Come When Called, Too?

Access my step-by-step collection of tutorial videos specifically guiding you through how to teach your dog to come when called, no matter what…

Click here to enroll in the Coming When Called Class

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

There are 156 Comments

  1. jay says:

    hi,my dog has some recall training.but off the lead lately he runs to greet people and if i go to him he runs away,when he is running to greet strangers if i cal he look at me and keeps going…3 times he ran across a quiet street so for me this need emergency help please….

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article and follow the instructions.

    [Reply]

  2. Britt says:

    I have a 1 1/2 yr. old Min. Schauzer. She’s a good dog. She loves to go for walks, BUT, as soon as the leash comes out she runs the other direction. I try to coach her to come with a treat, th no avail . It is so annoying.
    HELP!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/puppy-wont-walk-leash/

    [Reply]

  3. colette says:

    we have just adopted a 2 year old springer spaniel he is good on command however the mere sight of a ball is enough to set him into a frenzy he took off over the fields with the football wouldn’t come back and had to be followed and caught with difficulty. its like my ball and me when he sees it. I can only think this was his sole source of stimulation before we got him how can I break this obsession.
    thanking you
    colette

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Don’t break his obsession, use it to your benefit read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-retrieve-play-drive/ and only take it out for play and training time

    [Reply]

  4. Donna says:

    I love reading your articles, as they are very informative.
    We have a 5yr old Havanese, Bentley. We adopted him from a pet store that was trying to find a new home for him for the previous owner. Bentley has definately attached to me. At first he was afraid of my husband, but as of lately ( we have had him 6 mos now) my husband is his playmate, as they play all the time with different toys.The problem is the come command. He will come to me, but if I am not around, and my husband tries to call him, he totally ignores him. Then when my husband goes to try to get him, he slows down, but takes quite a while to get him and he drops his head and tail. We have never yelled at him, or been mean to him at all. We were told that the previous owners had a grandson, or male child, that was rather mean to him. Is there any way to reverse these behaviors with my husband. My hubby loves Bentley, but is having a hard time with him coming to him or even walking on a leash with him. Thank you

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Make it more rewarding, add scrumptious treats and games as mentioned in the article.

    [Reply]

  5. Howard Albrecht says:

    I’ve been using treats to get my dog Henry to do
    things. So far he’s pretty much potty trained.
    Leaves things upon request or until I give him the OK signal. He even d comes to me — sometimes.
    Problem is I’ve been so dependent on treats, when it comes
    time to eat he doesn’t want any. Turns his nose up at it. I”ve tried several brands to no avail. I’ve tried to entice him
    with chicken and the like, but all he does in eat the chicken.
    What should I do? Stop the treats or now worry about the food and when he gets hungry he’ll come around.

    Thanks for you help.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    read this
    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/misusing-treats-dog-training/

    [Reply]

  6. Kathy says:

    Love your training tips. Have used several and have a very well behaved Border Collie cross Australian Cattle Dog (Male desexed). He is a rescue dog (I have had him since January this year) and he has learnt to shake hands, play dead, shake hands, high five, retrieve etc,not go out the door before me,come when called and to sit at the gate and not go out without my okay. HOWEVER my neighbour across the road has 5 dogs who I have met, 4 little dogs and one the same size as my dog. None of whom are desexed. My problem is that my neigbour’s dogs are always running on the road and when I take my dog to the gate they growl, bark and come charging towards us and onto my property. My dog just reacts and he goes running towards them. I call come three to four times before he actually comes ? Heckles raised etc. The training to not go out the gate seems to fly out the window. I live on a 5 acre farm and my neighbour is across the road. Cars scoot down at fairly high speeds. I have talked to my niegbour and it hasn’t made a difference. I also have a small elderly deaf dog. It has got so bad that I can’t take my dog around my property without my neigbours dogs going balistic and running onto my property. Any ideas?
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep your dogs on leash and speak to your neighbor. If they are unwilling to comply, call animal control.

    [Reply]

  7. Lafran says:

    Hi your newsletters and tips are awesome and effective! I have a yorkiepoo:Noel good dog besides I tried everything to potty train her yet she releases any&everywhere all over my house! I had no problems with her coming until: my room=her room=her “territory”=never “release”. One day I was gone too long so she released in my room,made it a habit!=my room smelling bad. I steam cleaned, changed her ‘room’,& make her sleep in her cage,& now when I leave she has to be in her room(no exceptions cuz of smell). She now does not “come” to me, she runs&hides every time I call or come near her,she don’t like me, cuz she thinks I’m “punishing” her by putting her in cage at night&when I leave. It’s really bothering me that she don’t “come”anymore & runs hide &fear me. I feel like we don’t have that bond anymore it’s sad n annoying. It’s even more difficult to potty train her cuz she won’t come to me I can’t catch her to teach her to potty outside so she releases even more in house. House Smells even worse. I’m beginning to give up. Pointless chasing her.Landlord mad(cuz smell if it doesn’t get solved I’m forced to give her up,kids will be sad. Please help me! Tried treats!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    search all of my potty training articles, and read them and change your lifestyle. You an search articles at the top on the search button.

    But you will have to be willing to keep your dog on a leash and follow him around in order to make a change and it will take longer but…. remember habits are hard to break

    [Reply]

  8. Erik says:

    Hi! I have a 1.3 year old English GoldenDoodle. I have her pretty well trained in the house. Down, stay, come, down, stay in mid stride, and then down again, ect. We just got a fence, and the minute I have her outside she won’t do anything! I try treats to get her to come and she just ignores me. I try to go get her and she plays the come and get me..I don’t want to chase her because it encourages her run. I am upset because she is so good inside but nothing out.help

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Then use a leash outside until she listens and play the game mentioned in this article

    [Reply]

  9. Rick says:

    1.5 year old Italian greyhound we rescued 3 months ago. We were told he was abused and confiscated in his previous life. He does not respond reliably to treats, often ignoring treats completely. Off leash, he is 100% in game mode, and his favorite game is keep away from Dad. He will not come when called and it can take hours to get him back in the house if we don’t attach a long lead to him because he is so quick. That’s true even if I tire him out before trying to get him to come.

    [Reply]

  10. Bruce Greenwood says:

    I have a 5.5 mo old boxer puppy – Brook. We are in the 3rd week of Companion Dog Training. I am struggling with teaching Brook the ‘down’ command. Do you have any helpful tips that you can pass along?
    Thanks,
    Bruce

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Absolutely, read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/difference-plouts-platz/

    [Reply]

  11. Sarah says:

    I have a 10 month old yellow lab. Her name is Lily and she was the runt of her litter. I have taught her how to sit, lay down and stay, she is very good at it and I reward her with treats when she listens and does what she is told. But her biggest problem is coming to me when she is called. I have taken her outside and let her off her leash to play fetch, she runs after the ball but she won’t bring it back or even attempt to pick it up she just keeps running. So I will try and call her and shake a bag of treats, she just doesn’t come and when I go to get her she thinks it is a game and just keeps running away. It worries me when she doesn’t come because she seems very interested in cars and I don’t want her to get hit. If you have any advice I would rlly appreciate it if you could help Lily and I out.
    Thanks,
    Sarah

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    A dog that doesn’t come when called should not be off leash

    [Reply]

  12. AJ says:

    Any advice for making my 2 year old finnish hound stop hopping the fence to chase rabbits? He is a very active dog. We walk him daily and provide him with plenty of toys. However, it feels like he might be bored or the environment just seems more interesting than our big back yard. Once, he gets out it is hard to get him back until he becomes tired. Inside the backyard and house he responds to the “come” command, however outside those areas it just becomes a game of catch me if you can while he explores everything. Sometimes, the car trick works other times he just looks at you to make sure you are there following and darts in another direction.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would recommend invisible fencing just inside your regular fencing to keep the dog from being able to jump over

    [Reply]

  13. Heike Gleibs says:

    Hello minette,
    thx a lot for your advice. I love it because it’s always in favour of the animal.
    I do train my beloved dalmatian a lot and regularly. We have made progress.
    But when I train sitz, platz, steh (also from a distance) this takes him about three seconds to respond. He is never that fast as your doggies.
    I also doubt whether the commands are reliable.
    How can I improve this?
    Thanx a lot for your awesome job!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I make everything a game. Want a faster sit, show the dog you have treats and don’t reward if it is not fast enough. Motivate the dog get him excited and then ask for a sit, if it is faster even a little or happier then reward. Teach the dog that fast and happy will be rewarded with this you will get more reliability

    [Reply]

  14. Don says:

    Hello Minette, I have a 4 year old cross beagle.he was a rescue dog with no history and we have had him for 2years with no problems except that he is unsure of strangers. He is walked 2-3 times s day and seems content. My problem is that recently in the evenings he will not socialise with us and sits in the garden for a long while refusing to come in. I have tried being playful and encouraging him with treats but he completely ignores me. I have to go out and put him on the lead and gently bring him in as any type of force makes him worse and at times I have felt that he might turn on me. Your help and advice would be appreciated.x

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is not a normal change. I would take him to your vet ASAP… not normal for a dog to change so drastically at 4

    [Reply]

  15. Samantha says:

    I have an italian greyhound. He is 10 years old and been with me since his first day on earth. He knows his name. Very well actually. He could be 3 blocks down chasing something and i say his name and he is right back at my side. If im in the kitchen he knows the rules he doesnt beg but if i call him he will come and sit for further instruction. But sometimes if im on the couch or in bed and he is laying somewhere else im the room, i could scream his name, whistle, clap, he wont even look up. He never used to ignore me like that. How do i teach him to not ignore me or only come when he feels like it? Or is he just too old. I had a maltese just pass on at 19 years old, i inherited him as im only 15. Up until he lost his hearing he would never ignore me. Can this be corrected?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would go to your vet and have his hearing checked.

    [Reply]

  16. MaryAnn says:

    I have a 1 1/2 year old Chihuahua, when I walk him if another dog is walking by he goes crazy. How can I control his behavior to be relaxed or just ignore to be more calm when a dog approachs or just walks by. Also collar versus harness?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    How often do you do obedience with him? make him sit, or lie down on command?

    Obedience is the key to overcoming all bad behaviors. Then I give mine an incompatible behavior like giving me eye contact or doing a down stay facing away from the dog.

    But these won’t work if you aren’t doing regular obedience at home.

    [Reply]

  17. Katie says:

    Hi, I have a border collie mixed with a perineeze. Hank hates leashes every since we got him won’t wear one. Usually he stays in the yard to go potty than after he is done I give him treats and he comes inside. Lately he will not come in leaves the yard I call his name nothing. After he goes potty I crotch down and say good boy and he comes running and u give him a treat. Most of the time now he Wil wonder other places of the yard or go to a neighbor’s yard and will bot come in. I made the mistake of every time I call him and he doent reply and I catch him I put him in the crate for 5 mins. Help!! Ik I need to teach him and plays games.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Leashes are critical to life he “won’t” wear one because you give him that option http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/puppy-wont-walk-leash/

    [Reply]

  18. Courtney says:

    Hello.
    Today my dog escaped and we did everything on this list, and she still wouldnt come. She is a Whippet x Shepherd x Boxer mix, and she ran the furthest away she has ever gone. No matter how much we called come, and walked the other way she would not come. (She was severely abused by a man and he cracked her skull…) Anyway. One of our neighbors came out with treats and she came right up to her but no matter how much I train her to come, she will do it in the house but as soon as we go outside and there are squirrels she doesnt care she just keeps running and today it almost cost her her life. I am a dog trainer myself and have been training dogs since I was fourteen but I do not know how to mend this problem. I dont want her to run again, and I am scared she might. When I put her in a confined yard with fencing she wont come, or she will come and then run away. Same goes for the dog park. Same goes for if I put her on a long lead and call her. She just ignores me. I dont know if its because the boxer in her is incredibly stubborn or what but I am seriously struggling and worried about this happening again.
    I dont know how to mend this problem.
    Could you please help me?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    There is no miracle fix without constant and consistent training. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/command-difficult-dog/

    [Reply]

  19. Michelle Bosher says:

    Hello
    I have just adopted a lovely 5yr old Springer Spaniel who at the moment is on a diet due to last owners who fed him all human food he never went for walks, my problem is he don’t respond to his name at all I have managed to get him to walk better at heal (he used to just pull ) but we are frightened to let him off the leash at the beach or any of the lovely big fields as he just dont listern any advice but be great thank you

    [Reply]

  20. christine says:

    We have just got a 2 year old husky cross akita we Is well behaved at home but when we take him out he can be off a lead as he runs away and does not come to any comand .. any help please

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    To know why, read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/rewarding-lesson-letting-dog-run-free/

    [Reply]

  21. ali says:

    I have huskies, and sometimes i think the instinct to run can’t be trained out of them. One of mine knows the word ‘treat’ very well. i can just say it in the house, or in the back yard and he comes running all excited. …unless he’s free, i can say it, he’ll look at me and the treat, think about it for a split second, and then RUN. :)

    no treat is worth his freedom in his opinion.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this… this is why http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/rewarding-lesson-letting-dog-run-free/

    [Reply]

  22. nate says:

    hi i have a 7 month old lab cross retriever puppy and shes a good pup but she some times grabs socks and runs off with them an wont bring the back and she runs around like is a big game and i try calling her to get her to come back and she just stand s there but when i get close she runs around again and it some times take me and my mum or bothers t get it of her what em i doing wrong

    also some times she will run out the front and not come back in side unless i put her in the car and take he and put her out the back so what em i doing wrong

    thanks heaps hope for a reply soon
    from nate

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article, play the game.

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-thief-retrieve/

    [Reply]

  23. Rebecca says:

    Hi. I have a King Charles Cavalier. 10 months old. I have taught him all his commands, sit, stay wait, no etc and he knows his boundaries. In the garden he will obey my command “Pyper Front” taught me by a trainer to get him to come to my legs when off the lead. He is immediately rewarded with a tasty treat. However when out in fields it’s almost like he goes deaf and he completely ignores me so ends up back on the lead. Help please I love to see him off the lead but worried he will bolt.

    [Reply]

  24. Mickie says:

    I have a 7 month old American pit bull terrier. He is great on a leash and has great recall
    However… he has been “planting” lately with absolute refusal to move. We have been trying to get him excited, trying to get him his favorite treats and toys, and the second he has one, he stops again. Is there a way to stop him from turning into dead weight?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    you have to be more exciting.

    I wonder if perhaps he has had something negative happen when he did come? He was yelled at, something good was taken away?

    But either way you have to be the most exciting thing in his life! More exciting than squirrels, other dogs etc.

    [Reply]

  25. erica says:

    I have an almost 2yr old Havanese “Monte”, who is the love of my life. He does not listen to me very well so i am taking your advice that i have read in this article but i have 1 more question for you.Every time someone walks by, either with their dog on a leas or on their own my dog jumps up on the couch and he will receptively bark uncontrollably until they walk by the house and are out of site. Is there anything i can do…. Please help

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-quiet/

    [Reply]

  26. RebeCCA says:

    Just read your article on the “come” command and I’m hoping you can give me some advice!
    I have a 5 month old pyrenees x caucasian ovcharka and I have read a lot on both breeds and they seem to not be obedient type dogs… they are used for guarding and tend to ignore a lot of commands. He has so far come a long way and when I have him on a leash he will listen EXTREMELY well. And when off leash he is loose on 14 acres and I can call him and he will come running full tilt to sit and get his cookie! However, when I’m outside and he is doing something bad – for example he will get in the horse paddock and I will call him and he just runs the other way… he will not come he thinks it’s a game. He must know I’m going to take him out of the paddock but I have no other choice I don’t want him to get kicked. Same thing happens if he takes something he shouldn’t like a shoe. I try to trade him with something better bt he just run away..I can’t even get close enough to show him that what I have is better. I’m worried that he will just be like that- sometimes will listen and sometimes won’t.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Life and training is a GAME. As you say you are mad, he is where he shouldn’t be.

    Instead make it a game of if you come you get something WONDERFUL like boiled chicken (or the like) and he won’t be able to resist coming to you.

    Then it is your job to make sure you don’t punish him, no matter what!

    [Reply]

  27. Jennifer Jones says:

    I just got a 9 week old poodle. She acts scared of everyone. She does not want to be petted and will run if you try to pick her up. She hides under the bed and will sneak to the kitchen to eat.

    She will follow us outside to go potty and come back in when she is done. Then she runs to hide under the bed.

    I sit in the floor and throw treats at her and try to get her to come closer and closer. I have made her sit with me in on the couch twice to pet her and she licked my hand one time. But when I set her on the ground she runs and hides under the bed.

    I don’t want to scare her and not sure how to get her comfortable with approaching me and not running if I need to pick her up.

    [Reply]

  28. Carop says:

    We have a four moth female pug. When I try to get her to come or even I approach her she run away. She is a love but she is going to get hurt. My husband said we have to put her on a leash so she know she has to stay with her. She loves to run in the yard so far she stayed in yard. But I afraid if she doesn’t come when called she is going to get hurt. She I take her to obedience school for training?

    [Reply]

  29. jen says:

    its sound lots like a man

    [Reply]

  30. Cassio Silveira says:

    Hi guys, my name is Cassio, I would like to teach my german shepard to come out and sit outside my garage door and stand guard until I pull inside my garage and close it every time me or my family members comes home. I live in Brazil and it is common for tugs to wait in the bushes until you come out of your car and rob you(or worse) inside your garage. I have seen it done by a rich guy in Rio, every time he came home as soon he opened the garage door his 2 Dobermans would come out, sit outside in a very composed guard position staring forward motionless and wait there until the garage door started closing, it was quite nice to watch it. Could you guys give some tips on how to teach that to my dog? he is 1 year old. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    why not have the dog come out and get in the car with you? Then escort you inside? Either way what you are talking about is a dog that has protection training and that is a whole other type of training you would have to look into in your area. Just a dog is not going to do anything.

    [Reply]

  31. Adam says:

    My blue Amerrican staffy oscar is nearly 3 lives what id call a privilaged lifestyle simmilar to that of a spoilt child he is fantastic as a companion he is perfect in porportion and apperance big strong well socialised he has still got his wheels the one thing that bothers me is all he does is sniffs when he is outside and he sniffs seriously when he finds a good scent he will sniff the spot for 35min drooling he has no interest in cats dogs children adults toys or treats he devotes his absolute undivided attention to the sniff if i put him on his lead he will stay staunch and fully resist with everything he has to remaining on the sniff my girlfriend and sister can not move him he can sniff for hrs iv had to drive out to litteraly pick him up to get him off the spot it pisses me off bad so i ocassionaly spray deodorant to stuff him up i know its bad but it sorts him right out he carries on sneezing any more suitable solutions to his serioul sniffing ?

    [Reply]

  32. My wife and I rescued a “7” month old puppy. We live in the country and she chases everything ! She will not come when we call and seems to only be encouraged to roam farther when we chase after her. How do we correct this behavior and get her to come ?

    [Reply]

  33. poorvi says:

    can i ask you one thing? Actually, i’m just about to take a golden retriever and to tell you i’m not an adult. i am still of 13. can you kindly help me in the task by telling what kind of training tips would work with this breed.

    [Reply]

  34. David says:

    Hi. I have 1 yr old American Stafford bull terrier/blue pit boy who is unfixed. He is very people friendly. And super love bug with me. Lately as he has gotten older 9 mo+ he only will be shy in public almost timid. He will back seat behind me if strangers want to say hi to him and and approach. Is this an ok behavior? Is it just loyalty and preference of whose affection he is getting because he will only really want my attention and no one else’s. Also lately over the past 2 months when we go to the dog park he has been I think too excited so he ends up semi attacking a dog. No bites or blood ever just intense rush with barking and it is persistent until someone breaks it up. We go to multiple dog parks. And we go 4 to 5 Times a week for 2 to 3 hrs straight. When there is less dogs he doesnt seem to get amped or hyped to where it happens. He grew up with two other dogs (husky and lab/pit) how do I stop the attacking? And the social braveness or confidence.
    If I get him fixed with the fights stop? But will he lose his muscle tone?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is not an okay behavior to shy away, but you also shouldn’t force interaction. He is telling you he is uncomfortable, and you need to respect that yet build his confidence through obedience, like putting him on a down stay.

    He is also trying to communicate to you how he feels at the dog park. He is uncomfortable and he is acting out in aggression. If he does this to the wrong dog, you are likely to have a severe dog fight or a dead dog. Even if the other dog doesn’t kill him a severe dog fight can end with your dog being deemed dangerous and that is not great for the breed.

    Aggressive dogs don’t belong at the dog park, period. You can find other and more effective ways to exercise him and provide him with mental stimulation.

    I would also have him neutered ASAP his hormones aren’t helping with either of these problems. I’ve never heard anything about neutering and muscle tone. If you exercise him, he will have good muscle

    [Reply]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *