How I “Dog Trained” my 1.5 Year Old Daughter To Stop Eating Playdoh

  • Pin It

  • Pin It

So yeah…

I admit it.

I “Dog Trained” my daughter.

I mean I had no choice right?

She hit that age this week, where she finally was able to climb up on chairs and get into stuff on the kitchen table.

So what did I do?

Yeah… I dog trained her, using the same 5 step process I teach inside my Hands Off Dog Training Program, for teaching dogs to leave it.

Want to see if it worked?

Then check out this video:

Like what you see in the video?

Want to see more demonstrations of how to use this on live dogs?

Then check out these videos on how to train your dog to stop ignoring the other 12 types of commands.

stopignoringcommands

Save

Save

There are 34 Comments

  1. David Priest says:

    I once saw a hint about breaking the dog’s habit of reaching up onto the table or counter top. on the surface of the table, place a paper towel with empty pop cans on top of it. When the dog reaches up and moves the napkin, the cans fall down to startle the dog. They will learn action reaction, no blood no foul, and lesson learned.

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    It can work. Just remember, that that gets into punishment based methods. And not that they never work, I accidentally trained my golden retriever to not get on the couch, because a gate once fell over on him and he had a fear of gates. So when I left I would put the gates on the couch and he never touched the couches again. However it had unintended consequences, so you need to be aware that using punishment will bring up other issues you might not have thought about. Not that I don’t think they sometimes have a place, but you always gotta be thinking about how you’ll handle the new problem you’ll always create, when using punishment.

    [Reply]

  2. Sherri McCartney says:

    I finally got it!I am so happy and will be trying this today!

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    Awesome sherri, did it help to talk about it from the kid perspective for you?

    [Reply]

  3. Brenda says:

    Awesome! This was great I have a similar saying I tell new parents to help them raise their children ” say what you meen, meen what you say! And follow through! Then the Kids get it early on and life is much easier.
    Every time my children were playing nicely they got a special treat. The oldest one caught on and I heard him say to his little sister ” let’s play nicely and mom will give us a treat”! 😀

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    Man so true. So many of us parents (of dogs or kids) are sending the message that we DON’T actually mean what we say. And this is the way to correct that. Thanks for commenting Brenda :-)

    [Reply]

  4. Donna S says:

    LOVE IT! Excellent.

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    Thanks Donna, when I saw her doing this I thought I’d would be an entertaining lesson, and help send the message in a little different way :-)

    [Reply]

  5. victor manuel vargas says:

    Forget the Dog Training wish I had this information when i was rearing my kids, That’s, Good job!

    [Reply]

  6. victor manuel vargas says:

    Forget the dog training, wish I had this when I was rearing my kids. Thanks for the info, Great Job.

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    thanks :-)

    [Reply]

  7. C W says:

    Thank you for these tips. We appreciate the training that we’ve taken. What do we do when the dog, gets angry, growls and is even snappy when we try and take something away she shouldn’t have?

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    That’s a good question. And for starters you DON’T do this. Instead, if you have a copy of my Hands Off Dog Training program, and you go to the section in there on Leave It’s and Drop Its, what you do is practice those exercises with LOW value items. For example, if your dog likes balls, toys and bones… bones is the thing he gets snippy at, and balls he could care less if you take away. Then practice on dropping the ball first, then the something slightly more loved by your dog, and keep working up until he can drop intense items. Its all about starting at a low threshold.

    [Reply]

  8. Julie says:

    Deer check I just wanted to say thank you for posting the wonderful video of dog training with your daughter Everly. I am also a dog trainer and use these techniques and I admit I do not have children however I just wanted to compliment you I’m the type of training that you do. This actually brought happy tears to my eyes. It’s always nice See a father interact so sweetly with his children or even his pets. You are doing things the right way and your children, your dogs and you will all succeed because of your patience and your efforts. Thank you for being one of the good guys. After seeing this I will definitely watch more of your videos and hope other people do the same. Keep up the good work. Thank you for your efforts and your videos. Sincerely Julie the dog trainer

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    Thanks Julie, that made me smile to hear that from you. Thanks for taking the time to comment :-)

    [Reply]

  9. Christine Pielenz says:

    At 7:00 minutes: “You’ve got to stop the unwanted behavior EVERY time it happens”–I think that’s where most people fail, with children and with dogs, and just confuse the creatures. Your video otherwise makes perfect sense to me.

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    so true.

    [Reply]

  10. Julie says:

    I apologize that should have said “Chet” not check. Darn spell check

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    And I’m accidentally replaying under one of my employee’s names, so consider yourself forgiven 😉

    [Reply]

  11. Kallista says:

    Yeah, I’m going to start doing this with my 3 kids ( youngest son is 11, daughter is 13, eldest son is 15). Seriously tired of the bickering turning into fighting between them, and the consequences of each of them then trying to spend an hour explaining why they’re right and the other two are wrong.

    I’m pulling out my clicker and a bag of gummy bears.

    [Reply]

  12. Ellen says:

    Thanks for this video with your daughter. Having raised 3 kids I speak fluent parenting but am not as fluent in dog training so your video really helped bring it home to me!

    [Reply]

    Jason Reply:

    Awesome Ellen! That’s what I was hoping for, glad it could help :-)

    [Reply]

  13. Klaudia says:

    Great video. I absolutely love it.

    [Reply]

  14. k bowron says:

    What a great way to explain it.Thank you.

    [Reply]

  15. Megan says:

    You mentioned allowing positive interactions with the off-limits object. But what is a positive interaction that my dog can have with a sock? Or worse, with my food?
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  16. Bette says:

    What about an old (hole-y) pair of socks reserved for the dog? As long as he/she doesn’t eat them.

    My guys, as their tummys allow (the mutt can eat anything without reaction, the purebred is ‘sensitive’), get the odd bit of people food, but it’s always in their dish in their spot, never straight from my plate.

    [Reply]

  17. Nancy Moisan says:

    Thank you, with my Sheltie, it’s the cat food. She looks to see if I’m watching and if I catch her after she’s picked some out of the dishes, she’ll spit it out. I have a board to prevent her from coming in this room if I’m not here but it’s a room we go through to go on the deck. So often the board isn’t up, that’s when I want to be able to rely she will leave the food alone.

    [Reply]

  18. Thanks so much for this video. I’m a trainer and I don’t like to compare dog and child training. I like to let my clients come to that conclusion which they often do. I always tell my people to be persistent and consistent. Dogs and children will test to see if you mean what you say!

    [Reply]

  19. Mary says:

    Hmmm. Trying to get my pup to stop ripping out and chewing garden plants. I don’t know how I could let him interact with them in a positive way; his only interest in them is to rip and chew.

    And he has an uncanny eye for picking the most valuable ones to destroy!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He is a dog, dogs like digging and ripping plants. Fence them, use invisible fencing, or put the dog on leash and teach a leave it with your plants and plan to continue following him outside on leash for training for several weeks.

    [Reply]

  20. Jill Savino says:

    I am a dog trainer, also. I have raised and trained 19 service dogs for large companies. I have adopted a 9 lb Malti Poo who is congenitally blind, and she wants to “touch” people when she meets them. She cannot as I am training her to be a therapy dog. Help! She can sit and shake and wave bye-bye, but still wants to touch the new person. Ideas????? Help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She is disabled, this is how she copes. I guess I would rather embrace my dog for who he/she is and find another hobby than to force a blind dog out of her comfort zone and create stress in an already stressful life and situation. Not all dogs want to be or can be good therapy dogs… as you know not all dogs want to be or can be service dogs.

    [Reply]

  21. Excellent for human baby and dog baby!

    [Reply]

  22. Teresa Hall says:

    Great example! After all dogs really are just like children. They are our legged children. Positive feedback in this way really made sense as to how I may try to do little trips with Bandit. If he cannot behave, take him back home. This will have to start on golf cart. Trips in jeep, well….no,same principal. …cause he goes crazy before we get 5 ft down driveway. I can stop. Get out. Make him get out. Tell him why and walk away for a minute. Try again
    Sure,it could take a long while. But then again maybe not. He is really pretty smart. Especially when it comes to BALLS

    [Reply]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *