Top 5 Reasons Your Dog Won’t Crate Train

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dog hates crate

 

I get a lot of questions either asked of me in person, online, via email etc.

And one of my biggest fixes for many things is utilizing a crate.

Crates help with potty training, they help with chewing, they help give your dog a haven when he needs to get away and they help to give you some sanity when you need a break from watching your puppy or dog.

They also keep you safe in your car, and allow you to stay in motels that otherwise don’t allow dogs.

In addition, they can keep friends and family happy when you visit; since they know your dog will be taken care of and well behaved at their home.

But one of the most common responses after I suggest crate training is:

“My dog won’t crate train” or “My dog hates the crate”

And, mostly likely either way; you are simply Doing It Wrong. And if you’d like to see how I’d do that RIGHT, I made these videos.

And, by doing it wrong you are allowing your dog to choose whether or not he wants to be in a crate; and let me tell you that in the beginning 96% of dogs would choose to skip the crate training even though they will also be happier in the end if they learn to love a crate.

Here are the top 5 reasons you think your dog won’t crate train:

You Only Crate Him When You Leave

dog hates crate

Love this Photo thanks Russian Dog Net for the photo

You only crate your dog when you leave.

Think about this, crating becomes a precursor to what he hates the most… being separated from you.

Even if you crate him at night and then again only when you leave he begins to associate the two things…  Plus chances are he is spending large amounts of time in his crate.

He needs to understand that he may only be in his crate for 15 minutes or less if he is good and quiet and you can’t always offer that to him when you leave.

In order to have successful crate training you must do it occasionally during the day while you are home.

And, in the beginning you need to do it several times a day in order to teach him and play with him appropriately in the crate.

The crate isn’t some kind of torture to be dealt when you leave, it needs to be his safe place and his house; but in order for him to think his house is cool he needs you to be around, needs to know he can be let out after short durations and needs to know you are not always going to  leave him alone in his crate.

You Let Him Out When He Screams

You let him out when he screams, it is pretty simple if you think about it.

Trust me I understand; it is hard to listen to your puppy or your favorite furry family member scream or throw a fit.  No one likes it!

But by letting him out when he screams or barks you are teaching him to scream and bark in his crate and this is counter intuitive to having a well behaved and crate trained dog.

Like many parents believe older babies (not tiny babies) need to get used to crying themselves to sleep and soothing themselves; so does your puppy or your dog.

He needs to understand he isn’t going to die when you put him in his crate and if you let him out when he squawks he is never going to overcome his fear or dislike of his crate.

And, in order to be let out, he needs to learn that being quiet in his kennel is what you want.

So if you are in the beginning stages of crate training then remember to let him out a few seconds after he is quiet.

HINT:  If you tire him out by playing with him before you leave put him in his crate, he won’t scream as long, he will be tired so he will learn to nap in his crate.

I always exhaust my puppies before I put them in their crates so they learn to sleep when they are in there.  They are way too tired to scream for more than a minute or two.  Even if you have to get up an hour early or stay up a little later, make sure you put a tired puppy in the crate.

For more on crate barking click here.

dog hates crate

Thanks Shiba Inu Forum for the photo

You Never Played Games with His Crate

You never played games in his crate with him, don’t worry most people don’t know this trick.

In order for your dog or your puppy to learn the true “gift” and “joy” of a crate he needs to have happy moments in there, not just barking and screaming himself to sleep.

You need to teach him that being in his crate is fun and that comes with crate interaction.

To learn more about crate games read The Joys of Crate Training

95% of the time I give my dog a big, magnificent cookie when they go in their crates, plus I often feed them in their crates so they run into their crates at least twice a day thinking they are going to get a great reward.

This helps to change the association with the crate from bad to good.

Heck I might consider going into a crate if someone gave me a brownie or a bag of Cheetos every time 😉

 You Locked Him in it With No Training

You locked him in his crate with no training or as mentioned earlier, no crate games.

Dogs need to learn how to control their environment to be successful and to be happy and for them to do that or feel like they can do that you need to teach them what you want or trick them into doing what YOU want them to do (otherwise they are training you).

For example, if you want your dog to enjoy his crate and learn to control when he is in it you must teach him that when he is quiet he can get out of his crate.  If you only close him in his crate when you leave and let him out when you come home you aren’t teaching him anything but to dislike his confined space when you are gone.

Training requires you to be home and for him to be in his crate for short durations as long as he is quiet.

As with anything, crate training takes time and effort.  In order to set your dog up for success, you must spend time training.

Spend time working on it several times during the day so you can change the way he feels about his crate and he learns to be quiet and take peaceful naps in there.

You Rarely Use Itdog hates crate

The other reason that a lot of dogs are not successful with crate training is because many people rarely use it.

People stay home with their dogs during the day or they put them in baby gated rooms because they think the dog likes that better (but dogs are den animals) and rarely get crated.

Or as the dog gets older the people move from using a crate to leaving the dog out in the house during the day; and so the crate is rarely used.

In order for a dog to stay current with his crate training, you have to do it periodically.

Even though 2 out of 3 of my dogs are able to stay loose in the house when I leave, I still occasionally put them in their crates.

I never know when I might need to train or go somewhere that they will need to be crated, so it is in my best interests and theirs to keep them up to date with their crates and their crate training.

 

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There are 74 Comments

  1. Bill Nixon says:

    My Chihuahua loves his crate. It is large and has a comfortable bed and many toys inside. At night we close it as it gives the dog a feeling of security. In the mornings we open it but our dog will often stay there for a while longer as he is comfortable and warm in his bed. In the car he travels inside the crate as it is safer for all of us. We have a station wagon and he can see outside and feel close to us during car trips.

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  2. Jeannie says:

    This is spot on. One thing to keep in mind is that for house training purposes, the crate space has to be quite small – just big enough for the dog to stand, turn around and lie down. Many wire crates come with a moveable divider to accomplish this. If the crate is larger, the dog will soil the crate and just move away from the problem. This only applies during the training period. All of our dogs are crate trained, most have some initial resistance as they would prefer to run around eating shoes and pooping in the corners, but they have safe chew toys, treats and they go into their crates while I’m home as well as when I leave. Their crates are also left open when I’m home and they’ll choose to go nap in their “rooms” during the day. Because we have so many dogs, three have been transitioned out of having an actual crate (their “crate” is a room that is secure) but they would love to have crates if we had space for seven of them.

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    Margaret Reply:

    My 7-year-old Chihuahua mix was adopted one year ago. He has proved to be difficult with his crate and will try to tear it apart when we are gone. He has broken out of it several times and caused some bending of the wires. The bed and the rug under the crate also become his targets, ripping and tearing and pulling the rug through the open gaps to the inside.

    I’m going to try to leave some treats in there when we are at home. I once gave him a treat as we were leaving, only to come home and find it still there among the tatters. He has a terrible case of separation anxiety. Even when we take him and leave him in the car, this little guy tells everyone within a few blocks radius that he wants out…as he decorates my windows with his snotty nose. Very upset guy!

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    Minette Reply:

    I would try a plastic crate and the things outlined in this article .

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    Dwayne Reply:

    Why does the crate have to be so small as to where the dog cannot move in it? How much larger should the crate be? WE have a large crate to carry in. He is a small dog.

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    Minette Reply:

    In the beginning dogs potty train eaiser if they don’t have a huge amount of space.

    And, some dogs feel more comfortable and confident in a smaller space.

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  3. Jayne Rennick says:

    Last spring you had a column on urine burning spots on the lawn. There were many products recommended, but one was very popular with your readers and I did buy it. It did a good job and I hoped to buy another bottle, unfortunately, my husband threw it away while cleaning out the garage and I have no idea where I purchased the product (purchased online). Do you still have this article and the readers answers?

    I haven’t found anything else that helps like this product did.

    Thanks for your help.

    Jayne

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is the only one I know of http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/urine-spots-lawn/

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  4. Sierra says:

    I would gust like to know how old can a dog be to be crate traned we have a older dog that we rescued and she is not crate traned ?!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    A dog of any age can be crate trained

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  5. Shirley Jaeger says:

    Enjoyed reading about the crate. We adopted a 7 mo. old dog from animal Shelter. He is now 2 yrs. old. When we first brought him home, he was such a demon. He was very easy to potty train. Our yard is fenced in around the back seperating it from the fenced in front yard by a gate. He lives in the back yard in the day time with good shelter to stay out of bad weather. Around dark, he is let in the house to stay in his kennel to sleep in all night. He seems to really love it. He goes out right before bedtime to potty. (He comes in to eat twice a day & can be inside about 3 rooms only for a period of time.) Thanks, Shirley

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  6. Evelyn says:

    My last two dogs LOVE their crate. It is like a security blanket for them. I rarely use it for punishment and they look at the crate as their place of jen from the household. I once climbed inside to fix the blankets for our current dog, Teddy Bear. He was slightly indignant that I would be in his bed. He tried to first climb under me and then on top of me. In the end I just say to heck with the blankets and got out. He was fine with that! We have ritual times we are out, they know when we dress up it is time for them to go to bed. They are ok with that because its their place and know we will be back soon. Teddy Bear has now earned the right to be free for the night now and now sleeps in our room or in the doorway so he can ‘watch’ over his household. We are his pack and he looks after us. So do not be afraid of the crate and do not give off that dislike to the animal, they will sense it and do the same.

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  7. Kathy says:

    I can’t get my golden retriever to go into the crate. I have put his favorite cookies in there with the kennel door blocked open in “his room” (a pantry breezeway between kitchen and garage) and they go uneaten. He happily goes into that room when we tell him kennel up or will do it himself at the usual times(bed and off to work) We put a baby gate between the pantry and kitchen so he is contained. But I need to get him able/ happy with the kennel for the travel/hotel factor. Help? He is perfectly potty trained and does well on basic behavior and at 20 mo calming down (less chewing and tasting of not his stuff) a lot.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    crating in the car is a great idea, no reason to change that.

    If the companion dog program is too advanced look into our other programs first as the companion dog program is mostly for advanced training.

    check out our other products here https://womach.infusionsoft.com/app/storeFront/showStoreFront

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  8. Pam Najarian says:

    How do you break the crate habit? My dog loves his crate. Lays in it when he thinks we are leaving. We left the crate open and he is good in the house. We took the enormous crate down when he wasn’t in the house. He then started scratching on the wood in my bow window. We put it back up and he is fine. I now have 5 months til Christmas to figure out how to remove the eye sore. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My dog insists on having a crate to live in

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  9. Leslie Sebers says:

    I have an older dog who I crate trained as a puppy, but who will no longer willingly get into his crate. Do you have any suggestions?

    Leslie

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    Minette Reply:

    go back to your initial crate training and games and keep up on it

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  10. Nancy says:

    Well, this article is interesting but I have two German Shepherds that are forget it on crates. Tia destroys even the hardest metal crates, on all other things she is so delicate, not on crates, and she fears them, on elevators she just grips to the floor when I get her on that, and Sadie is my Houdini on crates she breaks out of them I had to use 14 locks on a crate and to keep her in.
    Both have separation anxiety really bad, but when I keep these two alone for short intervals they are good, 5 1/2 hours well we can be sure we are going to come home to a mess on the carpet. If Sadie does wrong well Tia will feel sympathy and do it also.
    Cannot be helped because I have to take my husband to the VA Hospital and that is sometimes the length of time we have to spend.
    I have tried the method of making the environment a nice one. Well, once they are left alone forget it!
    Both are rescue dogs and well Sadie I trained but Tia is going to take a lot longer, she has really bad fright on stuff.
    Cowls on everything. So have to watch how I talk to her. I don’t have to talk loud that is for sure.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    dogs can’t break out of crates like these http://leerburg.com/1165.htm

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  11. Rip says:

    We have two small (8.5 & 10 lb) mixed rescues about a year and a half old. They share a large wire crate. We leave it open all the time except when we have to leave them. We try not to be gone for more than 4-5 hours. Both are very good to get into the crate before we leave and both will also use it on a daily basis for naps, etc. We keep a small amount of food and water in it. They get along well, but are very ready to get out of the crate when we return. We don’t crate them at night as they let us share their king size bed with them. Is it a good idea to let two dogs share a crate like this or should they both have their own crate? Yeah, I know, it’s a little late now.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Their own crates are important. Think when one of them gets old or hurt or doesn’t want to be stepped on etc.

    Many dogs with dysplasia and pain get aggressive when they have to share a crate as they age

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  12. Laura says:

    My dogs all get every meal in their crates, and always ride in the car in one. And since we are generally going somewhere fun, the crate is always the means to a happy end: food or a play date somewhere. They love being in their crates!

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  13. Jaime says:

    Also another great tip is to cover all sides but the entrance side. This also reinforces the den-like nature of the crate. We recently had to re-train our pup bc she would go crazy she put in & door closed even if we were here. So we put crate in our bathroom and only provided a soft blanket in the crate and left the door open, slowly while at home we would close the door and she did fine. Only took an additional week to re-train but so worth it. Both my pups know that is their “safe-haven” we don’t allow the kids or other dogs in their crates. So it’s the one place in our crazy house that’s just for them (separately of course.). Just remember that it takes patience and a few nights of not a lot of sleep but so worth it in the end. Something that wasn’t mentioned is if your dog has to be kenneled at the vets office, so many not trained go crazy & meds may even be needed. We crate at night, when we are gone, but also at nap times our when I need to do a chore without their “help”. They are very happy to go in and get a good nap,or when I need a time-out from their rough-housing. NEVER use as punishment or when very angry. Wait until the dust settles and then it timeout time. Good luck to any out there struggling, I promise they aren’t dying, just mad & want you to give in and let them out. You are alpha and you train them. Not the other way around.

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  14. mary lewis says:

    my 7 mo.sheppherd tears up anything I put in the crate. He also does not always potty outside. Sometimes he goes outside and then comes in and goes again. This is the first time I have had such a problem with a dog. He was in two other homes before mine; but it shouldnt make any difference ; right?

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  15. AMANDA DONAHUE says:

    HI there!
    I have a 5 year old Spaniel and she LOVES her crate and is fully trained. We just rescued a 4 year old Shih-Tzu, and they both really get along beautifully, However, I cannot find anything on if I should crate them together or not. The new dog, Baxter, was never crate trained and does not like it, so I’m in the process of following your guide lines now. I stay home with them so it’s my full-time job and I love it!
    Anyway, should I crate them together?
    Amanda D.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    No, crate them separately. They need to have their own identities and learn to be alone sometimes. So many times people want their dogs to rely on one another but if one gets sick or dies before the other, then you have a dog that can’t function alone.

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  16. Patricia says:

    I have a problem walking my new rescue dog on a leash. He lunges and barks uncontrollably at everything and anything. I have tried making him sit and telling him “no”, but as soon as I let him walk he starts all over again. Please help! Its very frustrating and embarrassing.

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  17. Doug says:

    I have a 9 month old Carinoodle puppy and she has been going in to her kennel no problem tell this last week. All of a sudden she is scared of it and won’t go in on her own even when we through treats in. We have no where elssee to put her she when she gets close we nudge her in. I know this is not right but I don’t know what to do. I bought a little bigger open creat thinking she my like it more. She afraid of it too. I put her food just inside the door and she stretches as far as she can to eat. We can’t leave her out at night or when we are gone because she likes to chew on everything. Please. Help.

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  18. Dog parent says:

    Then why ever close it? I mean, if he loves it and it’s so great why trap him in a cage? This is Stockholm syndrome. I understand the usefulness of “crate training” I just don’t know why all these training sites and dog parents are so adamant that they are not just locking their dog away. My dog has a dog house. He loves it, feels secure, and occasionally sleeps in it. But I would never put a door on it and confine her in it. It’s barely twice her size. It IS cruel and callous. But since it’s “crate training” and the dogs “love” it it’s fine. I think if you crate train a dog you should have to spend a day in jail so you know how it feels. At least go tour a prison there are thousands of human beings locked in crates behaving so they can get out, I hope you don’t think they are happy too.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    hahaha crate training saves lives! And, I shut the door on my house every day! Just like prison

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  19. Joe dawson says:

    I just got a terrier mix 12 weeks now. I have been crate training him and he is doing pretty well. However, I have been on vacation am was able to dedicate time to teaching him. Now that I am going back to work, I will need to leave him crated for a little over 7 hours. Will that be okay. Not sure I have choices as I have nobody to visit him?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The recipe is however many months old the puppy is plus one hour. So, it would be much better if the puppy could be let out by a neighbor or someone at about 4 hours.

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  20. Joe dawson says:

    Thank you great info. I just found out he is 4 months and not 3. I will use this information to help me.

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  21. jane says:

    Help!! I had 2 english springers and just put one down 2 weeks ago! Both were in separate crates every evening and during the day for the past 8 years! Now the one that is still with us will not stay in her crate. She has destroyed 2 of them so far and I am afraid she will get hurt. We have been letting her with us more as we feel sorry for her – but when we go to work we need her contained. Any suggestions? Do I just give up or keep on trying the crate?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    How old? Dogs mourn too and sometimes a vet can help with medication if the dog is older.

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  22. Cathy says:

    I have a 5 mo old Shorke. She sleeps in her grate w/o a problem at night . She poops outside in the morning and early aftn and Eve. During midday she will poop in the crate and often eat it. She is feed a high nutritious food that is grain free and vet checked as very healthy. As recommended is given crate space appropriate to her size ( stand up & turn around) . She is not feed in the crate and always given the outside opportunity to go out after meals and before crating. We have been told she should be able to hold it at this age for as often as she has been let out . Any advice

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Is she taken out every 2-3 hours?

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  23. Cathy says:

    She is let out mid – morning by a neighbor on my work days . She may go 1 hr after breakfast or 4 hrs – so catching her time is near impossible – but we have been told that she should be able to hold a poop for this amt of time at her age .

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  24. Megan says:

    This is a great article- we just adopted a 1 yr. old black lab mix. He HATES going in his crate- and he will throw the biggest fit for the first 5-10 minutes, but then he eventually calms down and goes to sleep. I really want to try and get him to like it-and not scream when he has to go in or run around the house when its time to go in, so found your advice very helpful. It stresses me out- so I am trying to find ways to associate it with something good and not bad (i.e. us leaving).
    I tried the like for the crate games but it didn’t work- any suggestions?
    Thanks!

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  25. Susan says:

    Our giant schnauzer is 20 lbs 12 weeks old & during the night sometimes just stands up in his kennel and pees. The only way I know is if I hear it but he doesn’t wine or anything to let us know he has to go.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    at 12 weeks he is still a baby… you can set your alarm for in the middle of the night or you can keep the kennel next to you and hope to hear him stir.

    I had a dog like this and I trained myself to hear the moment he stood up and rustled and I would get him outside.

    Thankfully this behavior passed

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  26. Me says:

    Crating a dog is cruel and unfair. How would you like to be stuck in a cage for 8 hours a day? You people are idiots!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Sometimes I am stuck in my house for 24 hours or more and I love it

    [Reply]

  27. Lea says:

    Mine does the same thing! I just adopted him 2 months ago, he is a year old. If I am home in the evening and put him in he is ok because I am there. But if it’s in the morning he knows I need to leave for work every day and puts up a fight about going in it. I try treats to lure him in, he just doesn’t care to go in and get them. I try to get in the crate with him to show him it’s ok but he won’t go in. I have a camera I watch him on while I’m at work and I see after about an hour he calms down for the rest of the day. Has anything worked for you?

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  28. maria says:

    In the old days you paid attention to your dog, walked him till he was exhausted, and did NOT lock him in jail for being a dog. It is so awful to contemplate this new way of managing your dog.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    many dogs died from chewing things up and getting hit by cars. I find that crates are kinder than getting run over, being dumped at a shelter, or eating something that kills

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  29. Harvey Bellamy says:

    Please help!

    I have 3 rescues now and my last one is 8-9 months old pug mix but saved from a puppy mill with 50+ dogs. I don’t know her background but she freaks out when the door is closed and I got afraid she might stroke out. My other 2 dogs don’t use a crate but don’t act crazy either. I know it’s a challenge with puppy mill dogs, but should I crate all 3 for equality? Also after 30 minute walks pug pup wants to potty inside. Any suggestions with puppy mill rescues? And of course crating her too?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would crate any dog that needs it. you can crate her in a room with the door shut and let the other dogs have the rest of the house.

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  30. Sarah says:

    My dog will only pee in her Crate if I put a bed in it. But once I take it out she can be in her cage all night and not 1 mistake. I don’t understand that !

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    perhaps she marks her bed in the crate

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  31. Elizabeth says:

    Hey, I have a 8-10 year old toy poodle who is a rescue, we think from a puppy mill. We’ve had her for years and she has never liked her crate. When we had one- moved it out to the garage- she wouldn’t even go near where it was. How can we get here to not hate her crate so much.

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  32. Jan says:

    Hey! We rescued a one year old shih tzu who had a neglectful owner who would keep her in the crate for 10 plus hours a day as a puppy. She is not fully house trained, which we’re working on, so we are trying to crate train her at the same time but it seems to be getting worse! She has been doing a great job of being quiet at night in the crate, but is now avoiding us at all costs when she knows it’s night time and trying to push and escape out as we close the door. We are keeping her in our room at nighttime and the living room during the day. During the day she eats meals in the crate and will go in there for our designated crate only treats we give her, but she still cries and whines when we close the door. At a loss as to what to do now and if we should not have her sleep in the same room as us to help her. Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    There is a fine line of too much crate time and not enough… you have to figure out where the dog lies.

    Obviously dogs need time and exercise out of a crate. Make sure you are providing physical exercise and mental exercise and training, otherwise the dog is bored in and out of the crate.

    And I find it important to occasionally crate while I am home so that my dog doesn’t just expect to be out of the crate whenever I am home. I make the sessions fairly short and reward for quiet behavior.

    [Reply]

  33. Dawnya Tharp says:

    I have a very large male pit,He had started just busting out of his wire crate whenever he wants to.This has become a large problem two to three times a night I have to return him to the crate,if I let him stay out he sprays everything around the house.Help

    [Reply]

  34. Kate says:

    I have a 8 week old BC, and she does not like the crate. We want her to use it when we leave, and at night. She pooped in it the first night, and we think this may be the reason we aren’t making any progress, she won’t give it a chance anymore. Any ideas/suggestions?

    [Reply]

  35. Shelley says:

    Sorry, but we have done everything right according to this article and after nine months our dog still hates being crated. She has gone through periods of seemingly liking it only to start barking periodically through the night or running away and hiding under furniture at bedtime. We have played games, offered her treats to go in every time, completely worn her out with miles of hikes and hours at the dog park, etc but she still hates it. We are now at the point, desperate for sleep, that we are going to train her to sleep outside the crate in hopes she’ll actually sleep!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would exercise until the dog would sleep through the night.

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  36. Megan says:

    My 5 month old puppy will go in the crate at night and throughout the afternoon fine with no crying , in the mornings i wake up walk her and play with her but when i go to crate her and leave the house she screams, Any ideas on what to do??

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is probably difficult to be crated at night and then have a short walk and be crated again. I would get up earlier and extend your walk or add more real exercise so the puppy is more tired.

    [Reply]

  37. Sam says:

    Hi, we adopted a 11 month old great Dane cross, we build a kennel for her and she slept in it at night, however because of separation anxiety, she kept on escaping from our large backyard. So we build a crate/cage built on to her kennel, and are in the process of introducing and getting her to be in the crate. Fine at night but yet to be in their when no one is home. any tips to get her to love her kennel, using dog bones and treats, but she is a very anxious dog and think she will start panicking while we are gone? Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Sometimes a dog has to work through some panic, it sounds terrible but we all have to do things we don’t want to do or that scare us to come out on the other side and realize it wasn’t so bad.

    [Reply]

  38. Hanshi's mommy says:

    We just adopted a 9 week old Lab Retriever and he HATES the crate. He even hates when the door is closed when he is in my daughter’s room. He has fell in love with a particular blanket but it is too large to place in the crate. He has a bed and he takes his naps in there. My husband works from home so we don’t want him to get spoil about being out of the crate all day. He is a very smart pup. He understands “no” already. Yet, he will not go into the crate.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    use the search bar at the top of the page to search crate games.

    Babies don’t always like their beds and cribs, either but have to learn!

    [Reply]

  39. Tasha says:

    Help!
    My six month old puppy hates going in her crate, but once she is in there she settles right down!

    I’m at my wits end and my mum is very close to putting her up for adoption. my puppy gets very aggressive and will bite and attack if we try to pick her up at anytime to put her in her crate.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    your probably haven’t played the games the article suggests.

    I would feed the dog in the crate and reward the dog well every time it goes to it’s crate.

    My dogs get large rewards EVERY TIME I tell them to go get in their crate.

    [Reply]

  40. Abby says:

    So, 3 months ago we brought home an 8 week old puppy (Border Collie/Great Pry mix), because of the situation in our home, we didn’t have the luxury of teaching her to “love” the crate before we started to put her in it. From day 1 she was put in to sleep and also for periods during the day, so that our new cat (Yes, we are nuts. Got a new cat and puppy in the same month) could have some house time. We did do things like give her treats once in the crate, offer lots of praise, and even crate her and stay in the room so she wouldn’t feel alone. Well, here we are 2 1/2 months later and she won’t go near the crate. It takes both me and my husband to get our now 30 pound puppy into it when we have to crate her. She was sleeping in it (with all the screaming, barking and teeth gnashing included) until she started to mutilate herself. Over the period of a week she ripped all the fur out of her backside and was starting to move up her body. That was it for me. I was done with the crate, and after seeing a bloody puppy my husband finally relented. However, I KNOW that she needs to be crate trained. Our last dog loved her crate and used it as a safe space. We need that with our new pup as well. My question is, can we turn this around? She is close to outgrowing her current crate (it is the plastic, travel on an airplane type). I am planning on replacing it with the metal more open type. Will changing the crate type help? She is also a very destructive chewer, so making the crate comfortable with a bed or pad is out for now (she has already chewed through 2 $100 “chew resistant” beds). What else besides changing the crate would you suggest?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I am not a fan of wire crates, most dogs injure themselves badly on those. I have an “Impact” crate for my difficult to crate dog. And, I play crate games. And I make sure he is exhausted when I leave him in the crate for the day. He also gets a piece of chicken each time he goes into the crate.

    [Reply]

  41. Betsy says:

    I have a 4 year old dachshund that we crate trained and she absolutely loves her crate. She goes in there on her own all the time and sleeps inside it at night time. We recently got a dachshund poodle mix puppy. She seems impossible to crate train. I’ve feed her in the crate be give her treats in it. She still will cry for hours at night when put in the crate. I am so exhausted but don’t know where to turn or what to do. Any advise would be great.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Exercise her hard about 2 hours prior to bed so she is exhausted. And, don’t give in when she screams or she will learn to do it longer and longer.

    [Reply]

  42. Dana says:

    We just got a 10 wk old Cavapoo. She gets so anxious at night when she is put in her crate. We try to wait it out, but she poops every time within minutes of being put in. Basically it goes like this- outside for last potty, crate, screaming, poop in crate, get her out and clean up, back in crate, sometimes poops again! We want to let her cry it out but we can’t when she has soiled her crate. What to do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    take her on a very, very long walk before bed so that she poops and feed her earlier so that she poops earlier

    [Reply]

  43. Casse says:

    My 7 month old pit pup is starting to get sassy with her crate. I’ve had her since she was 3 weeks old. Anyways she’s now started this new thing where she whines and barks for a long time until she gets out. It’s frustrating especially now that she does it all the time and now she’s starting to do it at bedtime and she’s never did it during bedtime before. Just kind of frustrated is all.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Perhaps she isn’t getting the exercise she needs. Young puppies play hard and sleep hard. Older puppies sleep less and play less on their own. It is our job to provide the obedience training and the exercise. WE have lots of products for obedience and then also add in the exercise.

    [Reply]

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